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What Car? says

1 out of 5 stars

For The Sport is spacious and, as the Shogun name implies, it's impressive off-road

Against It's based on a pick-up truck, and it shows it in its poor drive and limited safety equipment

Verdict It can't hide its commercial vehicle origins, and it's definitely at its best off-road

Go for… 2.5 TD Classic

Avoid… 3.0 V6 Elegance

Mitsubishi Shogun Sport 4x4
  • 1. For such a big car, space is quite tight in the front. And there's no reach adjustment on the steering wheel
  • 2. The spacious boot is spoilt by a high sill, which makes loading awkward
  • 3. If the car is used for towing regularly, the steering, suspension and transmission can suffer
  • 4. Owners' most common complaints centre on the poor ride comfort and lack of refinement
  • 5. There's plenty of head- and legroom in the back
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Mitsubishi Shogun Sport 4x4 full review with expert trade views

To be harsh, the Shogun Sport is most like a pick-up truck. It's effectively a renamed version of the Challenger it replaced, and both have their roots in a commercial vehicle.

There's little safety and security kit, and the unsettled ride feels every ripple in the Tarmac. That stiff suspension means that, over mid-corner bumps, the rear end can skip out of line all too easily, which is difficult to correct thanks to the slow steering.

A Nissan X-Trail will be far better on-road, but if you need an off-road workhorse, a Shogun Sport will suit you down to the - muddy - ground.

Oddly for such a big car, space is quite tight in the front, and you notice the lack of reach adjustment on the steering wheel. There's plenty of head- and legroom in the back, though, as well as a spacious boot that's spoilt only by a high sill.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Black or silver best colours. 2.5TD Warrior most sought after

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

Although there was a short-lived dual-fuel version of the Shogun Sport, your choice is basically a 3.0-litre V6 petrol or 2.5-litre turbodiesel. For us, it's the diesel every time.

Although they're less powerful than the petrol models, diesel models have lower gears, so it's almost as strong at low revs as the larger V6. It's also more suited to off-road use and returns better fuel economy.

It's also cheaper to insure, because (unlike the petrol) it's available in basic Classic trim, and this is the version we think makes the best buy. The Shogun Sport is a workhorse, so there's no point shelling out for luxuries you don't need.

That said, Classic is the only version with no air-con, so you may decide to upgrade to Equippe or (with the V6 petrol only) Elegance. For the ultimate in luxury (including leather upholstery), you'll need to find a Warrior model, which was introduced in late 2003.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Sales only average although V6 okay, 2.5 diesel is best for stock

James Ruppert
Used car guru

The Shogun Sport is a relatively low-cost way into a 4x4, and cheaper than a Jeep Cherokee or Nissan X-Trail. Even the Kia Sorento, supposedly a budget buy, is more expensive as a used car at any age.

However, the running costs are not nearly so attractive. Even on the diesel version, you'll get much less than 30mpg, which compares very poorly to the near-40mpg of a diesel Nissan X-Trail or the 36mpg of a Kia Sorento.

Insurance, too, will be costly. Most Sports (and all petrols) sit in group 16, with even the cheapest in group 13. Yet the Sorento and X-Trail are both several groups lower.

The Kia and Nissan also make the Shogun Sport's regular maintenance look expensive, but any unscheduled work could be even worse. Warranty Direct says the average cost for Mitsubishi repairs is higher than those for prestige brands such as BMW, and for other 4x4 makes, including Land Rover and Jeep.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Black or silver best colours. 2.5TD Warrior most sought after

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

As long as it's well looked after and serviced properly, it's tough as old boots and you should have little to fear.

According to Warranty Direct, the only troubles come when it is abused. Particularly if its full towing capacity is regularly used, the steering, suspension and transmission can suffer.

Other than that, we're aware of no major problems with the car, and there have been no recalls affecting it throughout its life.

All this is reflected in the experience of Warranty Direct. According to their figures, although the Mitsubishis are among the oldest cars on their fleet, they are well below average in terms of the number of the claims on them.

Likewise, very few owners have posted reviews of the Shogun Sport online, but the few that have report no issues at all with the car's reliability. The only common complaints centre on the poor ride comfort and lack of refinement.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Sales only average although V6 okay, 2.5 diesel is best for stock

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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