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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For The Streetka has cheeky looks and offers nimble handling in an affordable open-top package

Against The 1.6 engine a bit short on puff

Verdict Fresh-air driving and fine handling don't come much cheaper

Go for… 1.6i Luxury

Avoid… 1.6i Pink

Ford Ka Streetka
  • 1. Make sure the interior is unmarked by water damage
  • 2. On a test drive, check the suspension is sound: careless owners can clip kerbs and bash the wheels out of alignment
  • 3. Stay away from vividly coloured special edition Streetka Pink. Even Ford dealers are reluctant to stock it
  • 4. Choose the Luxury version if you can find one - it has leather seats
  • 5. The boot space isn't good, even for a car this size
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Ford Ka Streetka full review with expert trade views

Cheeky, chirpy and cheerful is the best way to describe the Streetka. It takes all that's good about the standard Ford Ka and then throws in open-top fun to come up with an unbeatable recipe.

Ford worked hard to make the Streetka's body as stiff as possible (if a car's body flexes, the suspension can't do its job properly) and its efforts have paid off, because this little soft-top deals with bumpy roads in a way many more expensive cabriolets cannot. The standard Ka's excellent handling, precise steering and tenacious grip have also been preserved intact.

However, the Streetka uses the same 94bhp 1.6-litre petrol engine as the Sportka, and we wish Ford had just continued with the standard model's zippy 1.3. Instead, the 1.6 wheezes like an over-the-hill boxer forced to do one last round - and it feels about as nippy, too. Still, the gearshift is precise and it gives decent fuel economy.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Over-priced new but heavily discounted. Not much image. A good used buy

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

There are a few different Streetkas to choose from, and all come with remote central locking, alloy wheels, electric windows and a CD player, so you're not short-changed on equipment. However, we'd recommend the Luxury version, because it includes leather seats which add that touch of, well, luxury.

The ICE model has an upgraded stereo, while the Winter version comes with a hard-top to keep the elements at bay. However, we'd stick with the normal hood, because it's quick and easy to use manually and seals out all that Mother Nature can throw at it.

One to avoid is the Streetka Pink. This is vivid, to say the least, and came out around the time Ford was helping to promote the Thunderbirds film, copying the paint scheme of Lady Penelope's FAB 1. Even Ford dealers are reluctant to stock this one.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Demand high and prices reflect this, Luxury spec best

James Ruppert
Used car guru

After buying a Streetka, the running costs will be much the same as for any other Ka, with the exception of insurance, because the Streetka sits in group 7 compared with the group 2 to 4 rating of the regular models.

Servicing a Streetka costs the same as a Sportka, and neither model will break the bank if you use a Ford dealer. Go to an independent garage and the price comes down even further.

Although the 1.6-litre engine in the Streetka may not be the strongest, it still returns a decent 35.8mpg combined economy.

Parts are not expensive for the Streetka, but make sure the hood is in good condition before you buy, and be careful where you park in case of vandalism, because the hood is costly to replace.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Over-priced new but heavily discounted. Not much image. A good used buy

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The Ford Ka is one of the most reliable cars that Warranty Direct has ever come into contact with, and the same goes for the Streetka. By far the biggest problem is the suspension, but don't panic, because the vast majority of this is down to careless owners clipping kerbs and bashing the wheels out of alignment.

Beyond that, the Streetka has no major problems. Its manually operated roof is very reliable, and, unlike the owners of some folding metal-roof convertibles, Streetka owners have no worries about getting wet if the roof fails.

Just be sure the interior is unmarked by water damage, as it's not too uncommon for a car to be left with the roof down in a thunderstorm. Once it's wet, the interior is very difficult to dry out completely.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Demand high and prices reflect this, Luxury spec best

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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