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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For Desirable and stylish, the 207 drives well and should prove popular.

Against Rear legroom is limited, and prices will stay high due to its popularity.

Verdict Beaten only by the latest Corsa, the 207 is refined and accomplished.

Go for… 1.4 16v 90 S 5dr

Avoid… 1.4 HDI Urban 3rd

Peugeot 207 Hatchback
  • 1. Space in the front is great for both driver and passenger
  • 2. LED dashboard can be prone to failure
  • 3. If you can afford it, go for the 120bhp 1.6-litre petrol engine
  • 4. Suspension damper failure can be an issue
  • 5. The boot is a good, useable size
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Peugeot 207 Hatchback full review with expert trade views

Peugeot has always produced popular superminis and the 207 is no exception. You get a roomy car that’s good to drive, and because it’s popular there are plenty to buy at a reasonable price.

The car has good body control through the corners, and lean is kept in check. The suspension also absorbs most of the bumps. The steering is a little light and devoid of feel at low speed, but it soon weights up as the pace increases.

The Peugeot 206 was often criticised for its poor driving position, and although the 207 is better, you may still struggle to get comfortable. The steering wheel adjusts for rake and reach, and the driver’s seat height can be adjusted on all models. Space for those in the front is great, while the legroom in the rear could be better. The higher-spec models have moulded front seat backs to help. The boot is a good, usable size and, as you’d expect, the back seats fold forward to increase load space.

Trade view

It’s desirable so dealers will overcharge. Shop around and haggle like mad.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The 75bhp 1.4-litre petrol engine might be tempting, due to its price, but it's too slow. The 1.4-litre engine with 90bhp is the better bet, but if you can stretch the budget then you could consider the 120bhp 1.6. If you want a diesel, the 1.4-litre is also underpowered, but the 1.6 unit with 90bhp is a safe option. The petrol and diesel GT models come with 1.6-litre engines with 150bhp and 110bhp respectively. The GTI model comes with a turbo-charged petrol 1.6 putting out 173bhp.

Although all models come well equipped, you should look out for the optional air-con on the 1.4 litre models. All models get front and side airbags, and everything higher than the entry models get curtain airbags. Only the Sport and SE Premium models get alloy wheels as standard. The three-door version is no more popular than the five door, and there are plenty of both for sale, so choose depending on your preference.

Trade view

It’s desirable, so dealers will overcharge. Shop around and haggle like mad.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The 207 should cost about the same as its rivals to run. Insurance starts at group three for the less powerful 1.4-litre petrols and diesels. The 1.6-litre models are classed between groups five and seven. The GT and GTi sit at group 11 and an eye-watering group 15 respectively.

Strangely, the 1.4 and 90bhp 1.6 litre diesel engines have the same fuel economy of 62.7mpg and low CO2 output of 120g/km, making the latter a much better bet. The more powerful diesel option isn’t much worse at 58.8mpg. The petrols are also efficient, ranging from 44.8mpg to 40.3mpg.

The 207 servicing costs are similar to rivals', but switching to an independent, as long as they carry out the work correctly, could save you up to 50% in labour charges.

Trade view

It’s desirable so dealers will overcharge. Shop around and haggle like mad.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Generally 207 owners are happy with their cars, but there are a number of small niggles. Wheel bearing and suspension damper failure have been reported, as have mystery electrical faults affecting the dashboard. In some cases the LED dashboard display can fail completely and need replacing.

The diesel engine can sound noisy when cold, but this should disappear once it reaches operating temperature. Be suspicious if it doesn’t. Some owners have complained of clunky steering, but cars are affected randomly.

One recurring problem involves a dashboard warning message about the anti-pollution system, and the engine management light. This can cause the car’s electronic brain to limit the car’s performance. It’s been blamed on a physical engine fault, or a software bug in the car’s brain. Dealers are the only place you should take a car with this problem.

Trade view

It’s desirable, so dealers will overcharge. Shop around and haggle like mad.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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