Our cars: Renault Twizy - April

Article 7 of 15 See all
Renault Twizy
Renault Twizy
Renault Twizy Technic

Week ending April 26
Mileage 1286
Driven this week 14 miles


Renault Twizy review

The Twizy has completed less than 250 miles so far this year, which is hardly surprising given that it doesn’t even have a heater. Nope, as fun as it undoubtedly is, it’s definitely more suited to the kind of weather we’ve been treated to over the past few days.

However, the relative lack of use during the winter months has given the brake discs a chance to rust. As you can see in the photo, they’re now slightly pitted and scored, and this causes them to grate noisily against the brake pads.

I don’t think the discs are bad enough to need replacing – a few long trips should polish them up again – but the optional protective cover (£150) is definitely worth considering if you plan to leave your Twizy outside next winter.

By Will Nightingale
Will.Nightingale@whatcar.com


Week ending April 19
Mileage 1272
Driven this week 22


I have always sung the praises of the Twizy, mainly because I think it proves that enthusiasts can find a fix in pure-electric cars. It’s so much fun – when the weather’s warm and dry, at least.

I still believe that, but there’s no getting away from its shortcomings. My daily commute is just over 23 miles each-way, and around 20 of those are on the motorway. So I’m clearly not ideal Twizy ownership material, but it is legally allowed on the motorway and so I have done the journey. It wasn’t too bad, but honestly I’m not a fan of being at axle-height to a lorry that is overtaking you quite slowly, in a car that gets buffeted around so easily and that you suspect offers roughly the same crash protection as a wet egg box. Yes, it’s safer than a motorbike thanks to a high-strength passenger cell, but that’s like claiming to be a better sniper than Stevie Wonder.

Then, in town, you can’t queue-skip as you can on a motorbike. Which is the whole point of commuting on a motorbike, and it renders the Twizy barely more urban-savvy than a city car.

I enjoy the Twizy very much, and it is still an oddly liberating thing to drive around town. But the more time I spend in it the harder I find it to really figure out how anybody could ever justify one.

Victoria.Parrott@whatcar.com

Week ending April 12
Total mileage 1250
Mileage this week 7


Now that the weather’s warming up the Twizy’s starting to become popular. No surprise there, but it also means that we can start to think about removing the optional windows that have been keeping some of the chill out over the past few months.

Unlike some of my more sybaritic colleagues I’ve never been a fan of them. I’m used to riding a bike in all weathers so I’d be just as happy wearing hat and gloves over the winter months. Another reason I dislike the zip and clip windows is that the doors are trickier to open. You have to unzip them, reach inside for the handle and then use two hands to open the door, one to pull the window away from the body, one to lift it up. They also make the gullwing doors heavier to lift.

By Chas Hallett
Chas.Hallett@whatcar.com

Our cars: Renault Twizy - March

advertisement

Free car valuations

advertisement