Driven: Ferrari FF

  • We drive the Ferrari FF
  • Can Ferrari make a four-seater?
  • Watch the video here
What do you reckon the FF badge on Ferrari’s latest supercar stands for? Flaming fast, flipping fantastic or family favourite?

Actually FF stands for four-wheel-drive, four-seat Ferrari.

As well as that all-new four-wheel drive, it has a decent 450-litre boot and hatchback practicality, including folding rear seats.

In keeping with its grandiose dimensions (those sculpted Pininfarina lines are 4.9 metres long), the FF is a grand tourer in the truest sense. The leather-trimmed cabin has four individual sports seats. The two in the rear are elevated so everyone gets a good view out, while the two in the front feature full electric adjustment.

A familiar Ferrari dashboard featuring bulls-eye air vents is punctuated by a big yellow rev counter and banks of digital readouts – there’s even a screen ahead of the front passenger allowing them to keep an eye on the myriad operating systems.

The F1-inspired flat-bottomed steering wheel takes pride of place, and features a rotary Manettino dial that allows you to adjust the suspension and stability control.

Leave it in Comfort and the FF is sublimely supple and impeccably refined, while there’s phenomenal traction, even on snowy roads. You may want to take it a little bit easy from time to time, though, because even a 91-litre petrol tank will only take you so far with an official average of just 18.3mpg.

Having said that, this isn’t a car that’s easy to be restrained in. The bark of the 6.3-litre 651bhp V12 at 8000rpm is addictive enough to get the right foot of a Green Party activist twitching.

Switch to a sportier setting, nail it for all it’s worth and you’ll pass 60mph in just 3.7sec. Keep your foot down and the FF will hit a top speed on the silly side of 200mph in pretty short order.

Even in maximum attack mode the FF steers sweetly. The super-stiff body and race-honed suspension give it razor-sharp responses, and there’s a whole battery of safety acronyms waiting to step in to save you from the scenery should the performance outstretch your talent.

The only complaint is that the huge carbon brakes don’t have quite the stopping power you might expect. Take your pick of superlatives beginning with the letter f, because they could all apply.

A great grand tourer with a great big asking price.




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