Toyota Land Cruiser: driven - Practicality

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  • Great off-road ability
  • Cabin looks dated already
  • On sale now, from £29,795
If the Land Cruiser has moved forward subtly on the outside, it almost feels as if it's gone backwards inside. True, there are more high-tech features, but the design and switches wouldn't look out of place on a Land Cruiser from 20 years ago. The materials aren't particularly swish, either. However, everything is easy to use and likely to function just as well 20 years from now.

Although there's not much glitz inside, one thing the Land Cruiser's cabin isn't short of is space. There's lots of room up front and rear-seat passengers can stretch out, especially if they recline their seat's backrest. The seats are split 40/20/40, too, and each slides to balance legroom and luggage requirements.

Entry-level LC3 models have five seats, with the option (for £700) of two rear seats that you can fold up or down from the boot floor by hand. LC4 and LC5 versions have electrically powered folding rear seats as standard. These provide enough head- and legroom for adults, but load space behind them is minimal. With the two rearmost seats folded down, the Land Cruiser's boot is large, even though the floor is unhelpfully high. The huge, side-opening tailgate isn't best suited to crowded supermarket car parks, either, although you can open the rear window separately to lift smaller items in or out.

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