Uninsured drivers causing more deaths

  • Death rate rises by almost a third in six years
  • Yet fines for offenders are falling
  • Government under fire
The number of deaths caused by uninsured drivers has risen by nearly a third in six years, according to new Government figures.

That equates to four people a week being killed by uninsured drivers, yet analysis by The Times has revealed that the average fine for offenders has fallen by 17% since 1997, from £224 to £184.

In 2006, 208 people died in road crashes caused by uninsured drivers, compared with 160 in 2000, the first year for which accurate figures are available.

Crashes caused by uninsured drivers cost £500 million a year in insurance claims and add about £30 each year to the policies of law-abiding motorists, according to Direct Line and the Motor Insurers’ Bureau.

In 2006, 263,000 uninsured drivers were convicted, compared with 255,000 in 1997. However, there are believed to be around 1.5 million uninsured drivers on Britain’s roads.

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