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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For Stylish, a desirable image, big boot and efficient engines

Against Dull steering; limited rear passenger and luggage space

Verdict A big, classy coupe, that's more cruiser than sports car

Go for… 2.0TDI 2dr

Avoid… 4.2V8 S Line 2dr

Audi A5 Coupe
  • 1. The A5 Coupe feels a little ponderous through bends and has dull steering – although it remains composed at all times. The ride is firm, especially with the optional sports suspension, and the car.
  • 2. Even the entry-level model comes well equipped, with 17-inch alloys, climate control, automatic wipers, leather upholstery and a decent stereo system
  • 3. Insurance premiums are high, with the range starting at group 28 rising group 38.
  • 4. There are also isolated reports of engine warning lights staying on and clutch failures. Some owners have also complained about rattles and squeaks within the cabin.
  • 5. Before you buy a Sport or S Line model make sure you take a test drive, and can live with the firm suspension.
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Audi A5 Coupe full review with expert trade views

Big coupes are a bit of a rarity these days, so is the Audi A5 worth serious consideration?

The A5's styling isn’t radically different from the A4 and A6 saloon, but this two-door has a far sportier profile. There’s decent space up front for the driver and passenger, but the offset pedal position might cause discomfort. The rear seats are short of head- and legroom. At least the long front doors provide good access. The boot is a decent size and shape, and the rear seats fold down to increase the load space.

The A5 Coupe feels a little ponderous through bends and has dull steering – although it remains composed at all times. The ride is firm, especially with the optional sports suspension, and the car.

Trade view

Go for the 2.0 TFSI over the 1.8 TFSI model. It’s more fuel-efficient and slightly cheaper to tax

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The first A5s were available with either 187bhp 2.7 and 237bhp 3.0 TDI diesel engines, or 261bhp 3.2 V6 and 349bhp 4.2 V8 petrols. However, in late 2007 the more desirable 168bhp 1.8-litre TFSI petrol model was introduced. This was superseded in mid-2008 by a 208bhp 2.0 TFSI. The 168bhp 2.0 TDI arrived early 2009.

There are also the four-wheel-drive versions of the 2.0 and 3.0 TDI diesels and 2.0 TFSI petrol. In mid 2009, all models received engine stop-start systems to save fuel and cut emissions.

Even the entry-level model comes well equipped, with 17-inch alloys, climate control, automatic wipers, leather upholstery and a decent stereo system. The Sport adds bigger alloys, firmer sports suspension and a range of trim options, while the S Line comes with sports leather seats and cabin trim, plus chrome detailing.

Trade view

Before you buy a Sport or S Line model make sure you take a test drive, and can live with the firm suspension.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Keeping an A5 on the road shouldn’t cost much more than its A4 sibling. The smaller petrol models have reasonable CO2 emissions, with the 2.0-litre much more efficient, at 154g/km, compared with the 1.8-litre, at 169g/km. The 3.2-litre manages 207g/km and the 4.2 V8 298g/km. The 2.0-litre diesel emits just 140g/km, the 2.7-litre produces169g/km and the 3.0-litre has emissions of 179g/km.

The 2.0-litre diesel manages an average of 55.4mpg, the 2.7-litre 44.1mpg and the 3.0-litre 42.8mpg. That compares with the 1.8-litre petrol's average of 39.8mpg, the 2.0-litre 44.1mpg, the 3.2 V6 33.6mpg and the 4.2 V8's 23.3mpg.

Insurance premiums are high, with the range starting at group 28 rising group 38.

Trade view

Go for the 2.0 TFSI over the 1.8 TFSI model. It’s more fuel-efficient and slightly cheaper to tax

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

There are limited reports of A5 problems, but the car isn’t fault free.

Electrical glitches and failures are the single biggest problem. The car's entertainment control system can freeze and refuse to work, while the central locking, reversing sensors and built-in phone system can also cause issues.

There are also isolated reports of engine warning lights staying on and clutch failures. Some owners have also complained about rattles and squeaks within the cabin.

Check out the car's past and ensure the service history is complete.

Trade view

Before you buy a Sport or S Line model make sure you take a test drive, and can live with the firm suspension.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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