We use cookies on whatcar.com to improve your browsing experience and to provide you with relevant content and advertising, by continuing to use our site you agree to this. Please see our privacy policy for more details. Continue

What Car? says

5 out of 5 stars

For It's as civilised as it is breathtakingly fast

Against Expensive in all departments

Verdict Still one of the best supercars there is

Go for… Manual

Avoid… Paddle shift

Ferrari 360 Open
  • 1. The 360 is an impressively civilised supercar
  • 2. Build quality is excellent. The only thing that squeaks is the leather on the seats
  • 3. Don't bother with the F1-style paddle shift gearbox. Stick with the standard manual
  • 4. The mid-engined layout provides superb balance and poise
  • 5. The ride is a touch firm around town, but that's only to be expected
advertisement

Ferrari 360 Open full review with expert trade views

Replacing a car like the Ferrari 355 was never going to be an easy task, but with the 360, Ferrari managed to improve on what seemed to be perfection.

The 360 provides all the raw driving pleasure of its predecessor. The V8 performance is nothing short of awesome, and the heart-racing acceleration is matched only by the glorious soundtrack that accompanies it. Thanks to the mid-engined layout, the balance and poise are superb and, although the ride is a touch firm around town, you'd expect that.

Where the 360 improves on the past, though, is in its refinement. When your right foot isn't making every effort to make the engine howl, the 360 is an impressively civilised supercar.

With build quality and interior finish also being a vast improvement on older Ferraris, the 360 is an incredible machine, even by today's standards.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

No longer considered a cool car by many. Too many unsold used examples

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

The most basic choice is whether to go for the Modena coupe or the Spider drop-top. This is entirely down to personal preference, but both look sensational. The Spider will be a bit more expensive, but when you're talking about a car that costs this much, the difference will mean nothing. Importantly, the Spider is no less thrilling to drive than the Modena. It's certainly no slower and it doesn't feel too shaky.

Both versions are powered by the same mid-mounted 3.6-litre V8. At its howling, screaming best the engine knocks out 400bhp for thunderous performance and an awe-inspiring soundtrack.

The other choice is whether to go for a manual gearshift or for F1-style paddles. We'd stick to the manual.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Modena preferred, Spider F1 not worth the hassle

James Ruppert
Used car guru

The 360 may have been the most affordable Ferrari of its day, but this doesn't mean that 'affordability' is a word that applies to the brand. It cost well over £100,000 when it was new, and with a retained value of almost 70% after three years, even the oldest examples will cost you an absolute packet.

Maintaining your 360 will also cost a not-so-small fortune. The exotic, complicated parts are expensive to replace, and with service intervals rolling around every 6000 miles, visits to the garage will empty your wallet on a regular basis. It needs to be done, too, because you really don't want to neglect a car like this.

The 360 returns just 15.8mpg on average, and that's if you're careful, which you won't be. Insurance costs are also colossal, and the 360 obviously falls into the most expensive group 20.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

No longer considered a cool car by many. Too many unsold used examples

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

We like to think that our regular reliability surveys are as exhaustive as possible, but you won't be surprised to learn that Ferraris aren't usually included because - for obvious reasons - they're a bit thin on the ground.

Many think that Ferrari ownership is one long reliability headache, but this has changed in recent years. Older Ferraris deserved the poor reputation, but build quality has improved immeasurably in recent years. The only thing that squeaks on a 360 is the leather on the seats.

From the limited data we've seen, this seems to have carried through to the mechanical parts, and if the servicing schedule is followed to the letter, there shouldn't be any major problems.

Do make sure that work has been carried out under recall, though, as Ferrari issued a string of them on the 360. A list can be found at www.vosa.gov.uk.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Modena preferred, Spider F1 not worth the hassle

James Ruppert
Used car guru
Haymarket Logo What Car? is brought to you by Haymarket Consumer Media
What Car? is part of Haymarket Motoring
© Haymarket Media Group 2014