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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For You can transport yourself and three mates at blistering speed and in supreme comfort

Against There aren't many of them about, and the steering lacks genuine feel

Verdict It's a phenomenal drive and comfortable, too

Go for… F1 paddle shift

Avoid… Manuals

Ferrari 612 Scaglietti Coupe
  • 1. If your pals aren't too portly, you'll be able to fit a couple in the back seats
  • 2. Stick rigidly to the 6000-mile service intervals if you want to ensure good reliability
  • 3. After three years, the car will probably be worth less than half of its original cost. Not a bargain, but still remarkable
  • 4. The cabin is snug yet spacious up front
  • 5. The ride is as smooth as you'll find in any grand tourer
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Ferrari 612 Scaglietti Coupe full review with expert trade views

The 612 Scaglietti may not be Ferrari's prettiest car of all time, but when you look at some of the company's previous four-seaters, it certainly isn't the ugliest, either.

When it comes to comfort, though, the 612 is arguably Ferrari's finest. The cabin is snug yet spacious up front, and provided your pals aren't too portly, they'll be able to fit in the back seats.

The ride is as smooth as you'll find in any grand tourer, and any noise from outside is shut out with impressive efficiency. The forgiving controls also mean that the 612 is easy to drive in traffic.

When the mood takes you, though, the Scaglietti has the poise, balance and well balanced weight distribution to attack corners as well as any sports car. Equally central to the car's appeal is the engine, providing immense power and a delicious sound.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Heavy initial depreciation from new so used examples are the way to go

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

Aside from the colour, there's only one choice to be made with the 612. That's whether to go for the standard six-speed manual gearbox or the F1 version, which provides a clutchless manual gearchange controlled by paddles mounted behind the steering wheel.

In truth, it makes very little difference. Both versions are as thrilling to drive as each other, and there's absolutely no difference in performance. But, for us, the paddle-shift version holds a little bit more of the Formula One magic that Ferrari is famous for. Of course, it'll also depend on which version you can find, because both are hard to come by.

Both cars are powered by a developed version of the 5.7-litre V12 engine from the 575 Maranello, which gives 532bhp. This, combined with the 612's lightweight aluminium body, makes the car capable of covering the 0-60mph dash in just 4.2sec. Not bad for a four-seater.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Blue or silver better than red, F1A more popular

James Ruppert
Used car guru

There aren't too many cars with a higher price tag than a Ferrari, and when it was new, the 612 was the most expensive Ferrari.

However, there aren't many cars that depreciate in value quite like a four-seat Ferrari. After three years, this massively expensive car will probably be worth less than half of its original cost. Not a bargain exactly, but remarkable nevertheless.

Mind you, running it will be hugely expensive no matter how much you pay for it. The V12 likes a drink, and you'll travel just 13.6 miles for every gallon of petrol you buy. Insurance costs will also be wildly expensive, and you'll fork out for pricey yet essential maintenance work every 6000 miles.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

Heavy initial depreciation from new so used examples are the way to go

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

Our reliability surveys are as comprehensive as they can be, but Ferraris aren't usually included. Cars this expensive are few and far between, so reliability data is a bit thin on the ground. This means that building up an accurate picture of reliability is tricky.

What we can say, though, is that the standard of Ferrari's build quality has come on in leaps and bounds in the past few years. Whereas the old ones rattled and squeaked and occasionally liked a rest on the hard shoulder, the newer ones are assembled with the sort of fit and finish you'd expect of a German sports car.

The mechanical parts are exhaustively developed and beautifully engineered, and we see no reason why they should prove anything other than totally reliable, provided you stick rigidly to the 6000-mile service intervals.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Blue or silver better than red, F1A more popular

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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