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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For Looks the part and has the drive to match

Against 1.6-litre engine is too weak, and all models are short on security equipment

Verdict It drives well, looks good and the V6 is quick, but the car is short on image

Go for… 2.7 V6

Avoid… 1.6 S

Hyundai Coupé Coupe
  • 1. The 1.6-litre engine is weak and too noisy when worked hard - the 2.0-litre is much better
  • 2. Watch out for electrical gremlins, including windows which don't work
  • 3. Hyundai's average labour rate falls below most of the competition, which helps keep running costs down
  • 4. The electric sunroof can stick, so check it thoroughly before you buy
  • 5. Other electrical problems include warning lights which come on for no reason
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Hyundai Coupé Coupe full review with expert trade views

The Hyundai Coupe's mix of Ford Mustang and Ferrari comes together to create a very handsome small coupe, which many passers-by will struggle to recognise as a Hyundai.

The driver, too, would find it hard to recognise the Coupe as a Hyundai from the early 2000s, because it drives with real panache and doesn't have the lumpy ride and coarse engines that were typical of the firm's hatchbacks of the same period.

The steering is well weighted, if not with as much feel as we'd like, and the handling is spot on. Body lean is kept to a minimum and the ride is comfortable enough for the Coupe to be a comfortable companion on long trips.

The 1.6-litre engine is simply not powerful enough and too noisy when worked hard (as it has to be most of the time), while the 2.0-litre is a much better bet. The 2.7 is not the most powerful V6 out there, but it's smooth and flexible.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Preference for the smaller 1.6 engine, 2.7 V6 really struggles

James Ruppert
Used car guru

The 2.7 V6 may use the most fuel of the three engines, but we'd recommend it for the way it adds to the experience - it does 0-62mph in 8.2 seconds, just enough for it to feel swift.

The 2.0-litre strikes a good balance between affordability, running costs and performance. It's only one second slower from rest to 62mph than the V6, although its four cylinders sound nowhere near as appealing.

Only consider the 1.6 if you really cannot afford one of the others, because it's slow and coarse, and its economy advantage disappears if you try to keep up with more powerful sports cars.

All models are well equipped and a mild face-lift in 2005 freshened up the looks, but all Coupes could do with more security kit as standard.

Hyundai dealers love the Coupe for the halo it casts on other models, so there are plenty to be found on their forecourts, while car supermarkets are another happy hunting ground.

Trade view

Duncan McLure-Fisher

Good reliability with low repair bills, but watch those electrics

Duncan McLure-Fisher
Managing Director,
Warranty Direct

We may recommend the 2.7 V6 for its performance and satisfying sounds, but you'll be pleased to hear that it's not a pricey engine to fuel, thanks to its 28.5mpg combined economy. You can expect this to improve further if you sit back and let the engine hum away on motorway journeys.

The 2.0-litre unit manages a very respectable 35.3mpg combined consumption, while the 1.6-litre car goes a little better to deliver 37.2mpg. Group 8 insurance for the smallest engine makes it attractive for younger drivers, while the 2.0-litre sits in group 10 and the V6 in group 14.

Hyundai's average labour rate falls below most of the competition and the company's service and parts are also competitively priced against those for the competition, so running a Coupe should work out very easy on the wallet.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Preference for the smaller 1.6 engine, 2.7 V6 really struggles

James Ruppert
Used car guru

A five-year warranty as standard means that Hyundai owners are very well looked after, and they're a happy lot as far as the Coupe is concerned, because they report very few faults with the car.

The mechanical components are tough and reliable, so expect no problems from them. Where you may experience some minor trouble is with the electrics, which have been known to suffer from the odd gremlin such as an electric window not working, sunroofs sticking and warning lights coming on for no reason. These faults should have been dealt with under warranty, so used buyers can buy with confidence.

Otherwise, the only things to look for are the usual signs of a careful owner and a complete service history.

Trade view

Duncan McLure-Fisher

Good reliability with low repair bills, but watch those electrics

Duncan McLure-Fisher
Managing Director,
Warranty Direct
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