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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For The i30 is well equipped, reliable and spacious

Against Dull styling combined with average ride and handling

Verdict The Hyundai is a dependable hatchback, but it won't set pulses racing

Go for… 1.4 Comfort

Avoid… 2.0 Premium

Hyundai i30 Hatchback
  • 1. There's decent space for five, with a surprisingly large amount of rear legroom. The boot isn't as generous, but it's a good shape and easy to load.
  • 2. One of the Hyundai's limitations is its bland styling, both inside and out. However, the cabin does feel durable and solid, with a logical layout.
  • 3. Of the two petrol engines available, we would recommend the 108bhp 1.4-litre, while the strong and efficient 113bhp 1.6-litre is the most popular diesel option.
  • 4. The 1.4 and 1.6 petrols average 46.3mpg and 45.5mpg respectively. The diesels can achieve 60.1mpg and 51.4mpg.
  • 5. Tyre pressure sensors can malfunction, believing there's too much air in the tyre and urging owners to deflate it.
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Hyundai i30 Hatchback full review with expert trade views

While the Hyundai i30 is not class leading in any particular area, it still ranks as a highly capable small family car overall.

There's decent space for five, with a surprisingly large amount of rear legroom. The boot isn't as generous, but it's a good shape and easy to load. The seats are supportive and comfortable, but taller drivers might be frustrated by the limited seat adjustment.

The i30 has good grip through corners and provides a comfortable ride. The steering is a little numb, though. Wind noise isn't a problem, but road noise is noticeable and the car thuds over poor quality roads.

One of the Hyundai's limitations is its bland styling, both inside and out. However, the cabin does feel durable and solid, with a logical layout.

There's a good selection of safety kit as standard, including a minimum of six airbags and stability control.

Trade view

Make sure you have a complete service history, before you buy or you might find that you can't call upon the five-year warranty.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Of the two petrol engines available, we would recommend the 108bhp 1.4-litre. There are more of them available on the used market, and the 120bhp 1.6-litre unit doesn't feel much faster.

Diesel i30s are rare on the used market, but the strong and efficient 113bhp 1.6-litre is the most popular. The 138bhp 2.0-litre diesel feels smooth and powerful, but isn't much faster.

The entry-level Comfort model has an impressive equipment list, with air-con, stability control, alloy wheels and electric windows all round – so there's no good reason to look elsewhere. The Style model adds auto lights, part-leather seat trim and upgraded alloys. The Premium trim isn't as well appointed as the name suggests, however it does have climate control, parking sensors and automatic wipers.

An automatic gearbox is available on 1.6 and 2.0-litre diesel engines.

Trade view

Don't be obsessed about the badge on the front – this is a reliable and well built small family car.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

With CO2 emissions of 145g/km for the 1.4-litre petrol engine and 152g/km for the 1.6-litre, neither are expensive for road tax. The diesels do even better, with 125g/km for the 1.6 and 145g/km for the 2.0-litre. It's the same story when it comes to fuel economy, with the petrols doing an average of 46.3mpg and 45.5mpg respectively. The diesels can achieve 60.1mpg and 51.4mpg.

Servicing a Hyundai should prove slightly cheaper than rivals, and the five-year, unlimited-mileage warranty means you should pay out less for repairs.

Insurance costs are low with the range starting at group 4 and topping-out at group 8.

Trade view

Make sure you have a complete service history, before you buy or you might find that you can't call upon the five-year warranty.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Hyundai i30 owners don't appear to have much use for the car's five-year warranty, because there are few reported problems to date. However, a few petrol engines have failed, while others have developed misfires. The tyre pressure sensors can also malfunction, believing there to be too much air in the tyre and urging the owner to deflate it.

In order to ensure that the five-year warranty is valid on the car you buy, you'll need to make sure it has a full service history and that the work was carried out on schedule – using genuine parts. Inspections are also required at prescribed intervals, so ensure these have been carried out. If you have any questions contact a Hyundai dealer before buying.

Trade view

Don't be obsessed about the badge on the front – this is a reliable and well built small family car.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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