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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For Sharp styling, supple handling, effortlessly cool

Against Expensive to buy and run

Verdict The king of cool, but at a price

Go for… 2.7D V6 Luxury

Avoid… 4.2 V8 Premium Luxury

Jaguar XF Saloon
  • 1. The XF's interior is an Aladdin's cave of contemporary design, where everything has solid and well-built feel.
  • 2. Of the four engines available, the 2.7 V6 diesel is the best all-round choice. More than enough power and lower running costs.
  • 3. The diesel version has average fuel economy of 35mpg compared with 26.8mpg - 22.4mpg from the petrols.
  • 4. Gremlins include doors sticking, fuel filler flap jamming. The car's air-conditioning and sat-nav have also experienced a few intermittent faults.
  • 5. Jaguar has gone a long way in improving its cars' reliability: scoring well in the JD Power customer satisfaction survey and What Car?'s reliability tests.
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Jaguar XF Saloon full review with expert trade views

The XF was a radical departure for Jaguar when it arrived in late '07. Traditional styling was gone replaced by a sleek, suave modern look. It's surprisingly nimble for such a large car and supremely refined. You can hear the engine but it's a pleasure rather than pain, and you're almost totally insulated from both wind- and road noise.

Once inside, you're confronted with an Aladdin's cave of contemporary design and futuristic materials. It's not style over substance though, because everything has a solid and well-built feel.

There's plenty of space in the front, but the sloping roofline means that the back is not for tall passengers. Storage-wise, the boot should be big enough, but the rear seats fold down for extra space.

Trade view

The newer 3.0-litre diesel might cost a little more than the 2.7-litre, but it offers better fuel economy and costs less in VED.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The 204bhp 2.7-litre V6 diesel (available up to mid-2009) is a great all-round choice. There's more than enough power for the Jaguar to be entertaining, but you'll benefit from lower running costs and better resale values. These models are the most common on the used market, but popularity keeps their prices high. A 237bhp 3.0-litre diesel replaced the less-powerful engine in mid-2009, offering improved fuel economy and lower emissions.

The 3.0-litre V6 petrol version is fine, but a little underpowered for the size of car, while the 4.2 V8 petrol model is silkily smooth but thirsty. The supercharged SV8 has 400bhp, making it rapid but expensive to run.

Jaguar went to town when deciding what should be fitted to the XF as standard. Sat-nav, climate control, electrically adjustable seats, a leather interior and parking sensors are all included on the lower-spec Luxury model, while the Premium Luxury gets higher-quality seats, upgraded cabin trim, larger alloys, keyless entry and powered folding mirrors. The SV8 model gets additions such as active suspension and uprated headlights.

Trade view

Unless you enjoy visiting petrol stations, avoid the 4.2-litre V8 versions. They’re supremely smooth, and prices are tempting, but they’ll cost a fortune in fuel.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

You'll need an executive's salary to keep the XF on the road. The diesel models emit 199g/km of CO2, while the newer 3.0-litre comes in at 179g/km – so despite the extra power it’s cheaper to tax. The petrol models range between 249g/km and 264g/km, so road tax isn't going to be cheap.

The diesels gives much better average fuel economy, at 35mpg and 42mpg, compared with 26.8mpg – 22.4mpg from the petrol versions.

You should stick to franchised dealers for servicing cars that are under the manufacturer's warranty. While this will cost noticeably more than at an independent, it will help resale values. It will also help to ensure that maintenance work is carried out correctly.

Trade view

The newer 3.0-litre diesel might cost a little more than the 2.7-litre, but it offers better fuel economy and costs less in VED.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Jaguar has been improving its cars' reliability over the past few years, while also performing well in the JD Power customer satisfaction survey and What Car?'s reliability reports.

However, a small number of intermittent faults and gremlins have cropped up, with earlier cars the hardest hit.

The electrics can suffer, with warning lights staying on, the touch-screen sat-nav causing problems and the stereo sulking. The fuel filler cap can refuse to open along with the doors, while the door trim can work itself loose. The air-conditioning system can also let you down, and there are odd reports of turbo failure on diesel engines.

Trade view

Unless you enjoy visiting petrol stations, avoid the 4.2-litre V8 versions. They’re supremely smooth, and prices are tempting, but they’ll cost a fortune in fuel.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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