We use cookies on whatcar.com to improve your browsing experience and to provide you with relevant content and advertising, by continuing to use our site you agree to this. Please see our privacy policy for more details. Continue

What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For Cheap to buy and run, good boot space, styling

Against Heavy depreciation, grumbly diesel engines

Verdict Not as good to drive as many of its rivals, but gets lots of kit and style.

Go for… 1.6 petrol

Avoid… 2.0 diesel

Kia Sportage Crossover
  • 1. The Kia Sportage looks great and has a practical, stylish cabin. It's well equipped and came with a seven-year, unlimited-mileage warranty that transfers to buyers of used examples
  • 2. The 2.0-litre diesel engine isn’t as flexible as some rivals’. The ride can become unsettled too easily and the steering is vague
  • 3. The Sportage’s diesel engines are a little boomy when you rev them, but the noise melts away well on the motorway. The 1.7 petrol is also pretty smooth, too
  • 4. Even the entry-level Sportages are specced up to the nines, so there’s no need to climb too far up the range
  • 5. It’s still early days for this Sportage, but owners seem relatively happy. A few electrical niggles have been reported, including problems with heated seats
advertisement

Kia Sportage Crossover full review with expert trade views

The Sportage isn’t as engaging to drive as its main rivals. The suspension is forgiving over large bumps, but vertical movements aren’t well controlled. The steering isn’t great, either, offering little precision, but remaining light for easy town driving.

The diesel engines aren’t particularly smooth or quiet when revved, so for the most refined drive, the petrol engines are the best bet. However, whichever engine you go for, wind- and road noise make their way into the cabin too frequently.

In terms of space and practicality, it’s better news. The Sportage has plenty of room for four adults, although a raised transmission tunnel reduces rear middle-seat legroom. For the driver, there’s a good range of adjustment on both the seat – which provides great support, too – and steering wheel, while the dashboard is well laid out and simple to use.

Trade view

The 1.6 is the best value example of the Sportage.

Rory White
Used car writer

The Sportage was offered with the choice of two diesels and two petrol engines. The 114bhp 1.7-litre diesel is economical, but rather flat at low revs, while the 134bhp 2.0-litre engine is quicker, but not very refined and used examples are more expensive.

We think the sweet spot of the range lies at the bottom, with the 133bhp 1.6-litre petrol. It isn’t quick, but feels more urgent than the smaller diesel around town. That said, if you plan to do a fair bit of motorway driving, then it’s worth investigating the diesels further.

Standard kit is very good. All cars get alloy wheels, air-con, four electric windows, a rain sensor, Bluetooth and cruise control. Move up to '2' trim, and you get parking sensors, a sunroof and part-leather seats added.

Top-level '3' trim offers leather seats, climate control and xenon headlamps, but we’d recommend sticking to the entry-level '1' trim because it has everything you need and is the best value.

Importantly, the Sportage is stacked with safety kit. Front, side and curtain airbags are found on every car, as well as active front head restraints. Isofix child-seat mountings are also standard along with stability control and a hill-start system, all contributing to the Sportage’s five-star Euro NCAP rating.

Trade view

Offers more style than most compact SUVs, if not as much practicality.

Rory White
Used car writer

Our favourite 1.6 GDi does average economy of 44.1mpg and emits 149g/km CO2. It sits in insurance group 10 – the lowest of the range.

For the cheapest running costs, you’ll want the 1.7 CRDi, which is good for 54.3mpg and 135g/km CO2. The 2.0 CRDi’s extra power means fuel economy drops to 47.1mpg and pushes CO2 up to 156g/km.

Trade view

The 1.6 is the best value example of the Sportage.

Rory White
Used car writer

Leather seats have been known to rip/tear and some owners have reported a problem with the ISG stop-start system.

There have also been reports of new fuel filters needed after complete loss of power on diesels and rear numberplate lights have been known to fail because of water infiltration.

Lots of condensation forming on the front windows/windscreen is often hard to clear.

Trade view

Offers more style than most compact SUVs, if not as much practicality.

Rory White
Used car writer
Haymarket Logo What Car? is brought to you by Haymarket Consumer Media
What Car? is part of Haymarket Motoring
© Haymarket Media Group 2014