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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For The Colt has lots of equipment, excellent space and a good entry-level engine

Against Small boot, dull steering, little safety kit

Verdict It's competent rather than fun to drive, but it's surprisingly spacious

Go for… 1.1 Classic

Avoid… 1.5 CZT

Mitsubishi Colt Hatchback
  • 1. A used Colt won't be that cheap because it's still too new for values to have fallen far
  • 2. We recommend the basic 1.1 engine because it's quick enough to use anywhere and responsive at low revs
  • 3. There's plenty of head- and legroom for four adults
  • 4. Even entry-level Classic models come with a good spread of kit including alloys, electric front windows and a CD player
  • 5. The boot isn't particularly big, even by supermini standards
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Mitsubishi Colt Hatchback full review with expert trade views

The Mitsubishi Colt isn't the sort of car you buy for thrills – it never has been. Instead, it's one of those cars that performs competently in every area rather than really shining in any one. Still, that's no bad thing.

Its biggest strength is its space. Four adults can sit in absolute comfort, and the amount of head- and legroom they get belies the car's small size. The dash is attractively designed and easy to use, too, and the materials it's made from are far more appealing than owners of older Mitsubishis will be used to.

The most notable thing about how the car drives is that it's very easy to drive. It grips well enough, even though the body leans in corners and the steering is dull. The ride is supple enough, too, even though bigger bumps and cracks can cause a bit too much suspension noise.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

More popular as a used car than new. 1.1 best value model

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

There are five engines to choose from. We'd recommend the entry-level 75bhp 1.1 because it's quick enough to use anywhere and more responsive at low revs than the more powerful 95bhp 1.3. If you want a bit more performance, there's also a 1.5 with 109bhp.

In the CZT warm-hatch version, the 1.5 engine gets a turbocharger to give 150bhp, but it still feels brisk rather than quick. Diesel options are limited to just the 95bhp 1.5 DI-D, which is frugal and flexible.

When the Colt first appeared, trim levels included Classic, Equippe, Elegance and Sport. Classic models come with a good spread of kit including alloys, electric front windows and a CD player, and we think this is best-vale package.

Equippe models add air-con and electric rear windows, while Elegance models get side airbags and leather seats. Sport models gain a body kit and cruise control.

Later on, the trim levels were renamed CZ1, CZ2 and CZ3.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Popular, but large numbers around means lower prices for all models

James Ruppert
Used car guru

A used Colt won't be that cheap. New prices are reasonable and residual values are only average, but because the car has only been on the market since 2004, prices haven’t fallen by all that much.

Running costs are very good, though. Our favourite 1.1-litre engine returns the best fuel economy of the petrol cars, with an average figure of 51.4mpg. The 1.3 and 1.5 give figures of 48.7mpg and 45.5mpg respectively, and even the CZT version will manage 41.5mpg. The diesel is the outright winner on fuel economy, though, with an average of 58.9mpg.

Choosing our favourite 1.1 engine will pay dividends on insurance, too. You'll face a group 3 premium on this version, whereas buyers of the 1.3 and the diesel will pay a group 5 premium. The 1.5 petrol gets a group 6 classification, while CZT buyers will pay much more – group 14.

Trade view

Martin Keighley

More popular as a used car than new. 1.1 best value model

Martin Keighley
Valuations expert,
What Car? Used Car Price Guide

Japanese manufacturers always lead the way for reliability, and Mitsubishi is no exception. The company has an excellent record for mechanical reliability, and we haven’t heard about any particular problems with the Colt.

However, the firm didn't fare quite so well in a recent JD Power Customer Satisfaction Survey. Out of 30 car-makers, Mitsubishi only placed 28th, but the results that led to that position included only the older Carisma and Space Star models.

Trade view

James Ruppert

Popular, but large numbers around means lower prices for all models

James Ruppert
Used car guru
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