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What Car? says

4 out of 5 stars

For Comfortable; good visibility; refined cabin: decent boot space

Against Only one sweet spot to the range; limited rear kneeroom.

Verdict Peugeot's star crossover is practical and easy to live with

Go for… 1.6 THP Sport

Avoid… 2.0 HDI 136 Auto

Peugeot 3008 Crossover
  • 1. Five-seater has plenty of head- and shoulder room.
  • 2. Go for the 1.6 THP petrol engine
  • 3. Our favourite Sport trim gets alloy wheels
  • 4. Boot is useful size
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Peugeot 3008 Crossover full review with expert trade views

Following the success of the Nissan Qashqai, Peugeot wanted a crossover of its own and the 3008 was born.

Instead, of trying to ape an SUV, it's more of an MPV with a high driving position and a spacious, airy cabin. The approach worked, because it was named as our Car of the Year in 2010.

The cabin seats five, with plenty of head- and shoulder room in the back, but kneeroom is limited. A futuristic dashboard dominates the driving position and all-round visibility is good.

Wind noise isn't excessive, and road noise shouldn't disturb, but the suspension can thud on poor road surfaces.

The boot is a decent size, at 432 litres, and has a clever split-level storage system. This, along with split-folding rear seats and a split tailgate make the Peugeot extremely practical. As befitting a family-orientated car, the 3008 comes with six airbags, stability control and a five-star EuroNCAP crash-test rating.

Trade view

There's a definite sweet spot in the 3008 range, with the 1.6 THP Sport the best version by quite a margin

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

While the 3008 range is reasonable on the whole, there's one model that's head and shoulders above the rest.

The turbocharged 1.6-litre petrol is the best of the engines. It produces 148bhp, giving decent acceleration and cruising speed, but doesn't cost the earth when it comes to fuel consumption. Other options include a 1.6-litre with 118bhp, a 1.6-litre diesel with 110bhp and a 2.0-litre diesel with between 148-161bhp. Of the diesels, we'd go for the 1.6 litre.

We also think it's worth looking for cars with the optional Dynamic Ride Control (DRC), which reins in body roll, but retains a comfortable ride. Cars without DRC have excessive body roll and feel overly firm at low speeds. Overall, the steering is light, and good in town, but this limits enjoyment on faster, twisty roads.

As standard, all 3008s come with front electric windows and air-con, but move up from the entry-level Active to the Sport version and you'll gain alloy wheels, rear electric windows and cruise control. We reckon this is the best trim to go for. The Exclusive adds climate control and a tyre-pressure monitoring system.

Trade view

The 3008 takes a different tack to some crossovers – more MPV than SUV, such as the Nissan Qashqai or Skoda Yeti - but it makes great family transport.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Our favourite engine, the 1.6 THP, averages 39.7mpg and emits 167g/km of CO2, while the less powerful petrol comes in at 40.1mpg and 159g/km of CO2. The diesels are predictability cleaner and greener, with the 1.6-litre at 55.6mpg and 135g/km and the 2.0-litre between 42.8-50.4mpg and 173-146g/km, depending on power.

The Peugeot costs roughly the same to insure as a similarly specified Nissan Qashqai, but more than a Skoda Yeti. However, it should prove cheaper than both to service.

Depreciation is a weakness of the 3008, so don't expect resale values to be great and avoid splashing out too much on cars with expensive factory-fitted options. You won't get that money back when you part-exchange.

Trade view

There's a definite sweet spot in the 3008 range, with the 1.6 THP Sport the best version by quite a margin

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

So far the 3008 is proving reliable, with only a few issues reported.

The front tyres can wear quickly – some owners claiming that a set covers just 13,000 miles. If the wear is not even across the face of the tyre then the tracking is out of alignment.

The built-in sat-nav system looks impressive, but has a habit of randomly shutting off while in use. Dealers are unable to find the cause, and the problem can randomly come and go.

The mechanicals are not immune to faults either. The exhaust's particulate filter can clog - especially if the car is used for shorter, stop-start driving. This activates a warning light on the dashboard, but a long drive at consistently high revs may help clear the issue. The electronic parking brake can generate a warning light, but this can be down to a faulty switch in the clutch mechanism.

Other issues include clonky steering columns, broken seatbelt adjusters and rear windows that drop slightly over time.

Trade view

The 3008 takes a different tack to some crossovers – more MPV than SUV, such as the Nissan Qashqai or Skoda Yeti - but it makes great family transport.

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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