We use cookies on whatcar.com to improve your browsing experience and to provide you with relevant content and advertising, by continuing to use our site you agree to this. Please see our privacy policy for more details. Continue

What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For Huge boot for this size of car and lots of kit

Against Rear seats don’t fold flat, and rivals drive better

Verdict It’s no beauty, but it will carry large loads

Go for… 1.5 dCi 106 Expression

Avoid… 1.4 Dynamique

Renault Megane Sport Tourer
  • 1. Electric windows can fail, and problems can strike the indicator and wiper stalks
  • 2. Faults have been reported with the keyless ignition and entry system, so check it over carefully
  • 3. Squealing brakes – a common problem – can usually be cured by changing the original pads
  • 4. It has one of the biggest load areas in its class
  • 5. Electrical faults are the car’s main weak spot, particularly if damp enters the fuse box
advertisement

Renault Megane Sport Tourer full review with expert trade views

You’ve considered buying a Scenic, but its high-up driver’s seat doesn’t feel right. So, the Megane Sport Tourer is better: it will carry as much, but it doesn't drive like an MPV.

The Sport Tourer name suggests it’s more about style than substance, but that's not the case. In fact, this is a conventional estate. True, it’s no beauty, but it does have one of the biggest load areas in the class.

If you’ve stepped from a Ford Focus, the Megane feels limp to drive. It rides softly and handles competently but the steering gives little feedback.

However, the cabin provides good space and keeps out most road noise, while the stylish dash is easy to use - although the U-shaped handbrake and credit-card ignition key are gimmicky.

Even the cheap models are loaded with standard equipment, including six airbags, air-con and a CD player. Only the top-end models have alloy wheels as standard, though.

Trade view

Kurtis Williams

Huge for its size and looks refined for an estate. Market-leading safety features

Kurtis Williams
Buyer,
Lex Vehicle Leasing

Compared with the Megane hatchback and the Scenic, this isn’t a big seller. So you’ll need to stay flexible over which used model you buy - or wait an age before you find the right one. Most buyers go for the 1.6 petrol or 1.5 diesel engines and pick Expression trim, which is the cheapest option.

The diesels pull hardest from low revs, which is something you’ll appreciate when driving with a load aboard. However, these models are dearer to buy second-hand, so you’ll only make a saving overall if you cover plenty of miles. Do the sums and then decide.

There’s also a 1.4 petrol, which struggles in such a big car, a punchy 2.0 and a 1.9 130bhp diesel. You can also go for sporty Dynamique trim or plush Privilege.

Out of that lot, we’d stick with Expression trim and either the 1.6 petrol or 1.5 106bhp diesel.

Trade view

Duncan McLure-Fisher

Questionable reliability - there are much better cars

Duncan McLure-Fisher
Managing Director,
Warranty Direct

Servicing shouldn't be too much of a problem. The work is mostly straightforward and intervals are variable – on-board sensors decide when the oil needs changing and the brakes could use a look at - so you can help to keep your own costs down.

Likewise, you can avoid the steep main-dealer labour rates by using a good independent garage. However, Renaults aren’t the most reliable of cars, so as yours gets older, it’ll make sense to budget for surprise repairs.

On the other hand, insurance is cheap, helped by the make’s excellent safety rating. The 1.4 petrol model nips into group 3 and most others are in groups 4 to 6. The 2.0 petrol and 1.9 diesel fall into group 8.

Fuel economy is also strong, with the diesels averaging 60mpg and the 1.6 petrols 41mpg. The 1.4 is slightly thirstier overall than the 1.6.

Finally, depreciation costs are average, so at three years old most models have lost two-thirds of their original value.

Trade view

Kurtis Williams

Huge for its size and looks refined for an estate. Market-leading safety features

Kurtis Williams
Buyer,
Lex Vehicle Leasing

Renault has had a regular spot among the bottom 10 makes in the What Car? Reliability Index. That said, Meganes are by no means the worst offenders in Renault’s line-up, and repair costs are cheap.

Electrical faults are the car’s main weak spot, particularly if damp enters the fuse box - check all the gadgets work and that every instrument and warning light responds correctly. There are also isolated reports of problems with the handbrake not releasing properly.

Diesels can suffer turbo failure – an expensive job if the warranty has expired and you’re paying the bill.

There have only been a few recalls to correct safely-related faults, but 2004-registered Meganes may have needed work to re-route front brake hoses – check if yours has had this done.

Trade view

Duncan McLure-Fisher

Questionable reliability - there are much better cars

Duncan McLure-Fisher
Managing Director,
Warranty Direct
Haymarket Logo What Car? is brought to you by Haymarket Consumer Media
What Car? is part of Haymarket Motoring
© Haymarket Media Group 2014