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What Car? says

3 out of 5 stars

For Practical; flexible seating system; sharp dynamics

Against Excessive wind- and road noise; unsettled ride.

Verdict Far from abominable, the Yeti is stylish and practical

Go for… 1.2 TSI S 2WD

Avoid… 1.8 TSI Elegance 4WD

Skoda Yeti 4x4
  • 1. For: Practical; flexible seating system; sharp dynamics
  • 2. Excessive wind- and road noise; unsettled ride.
  • 3. Sharp steering and plenty of traction make the Yeti is surprising enjoyable to drive, but unless the road is perfectly smooth the ride is unsettled whatever the speed.
  • 4. Running the Skoda should cost slightly less than its rivals. It’s cheaper to service than the Nissan Qashqai and roughly the same as the Peugeot 3008, but is noticeably cheaper to insure than both
  • 5. Both petrol and diesel engines can have high oil consumption, in some cases as much as a litre every 1000 miles. If the oil has been allowed to run low there could be engine damage.
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Skoda Yeti 4x4 full review with expert trade views

The Yeti is Skoda’s answer to the Nissan Qashqai and Peugeot 3008. Like an oversized Tonka toy, it’s designed to be durable yet enjoyable and good for those with kids.

The car’s wide and tall stance means there’s generous leg-, shoulder- and headroom for five passengers and, like many crossovers, the rear seats slide backwards and forwards to favour legroom or boot space. However, that’s not all, because the rear bench can also be folded down, tumbled forward or even removed completely if you need some serious load space. The boot is roughly the same size as its rivals', at 416 litres.

The large windows means all-round visibility is good, and the driver’s seat has enough adjustment for people of all shapes and sizes to get comfortable.

Sharp steering and plenty of traction make the Yeti is surprising enjoyable to drive, but unless the road is perfectly smooth the ride is unsettled whatever the speed. Wind- and road noise become a problem at higher speeds.

Trade view

The Yeti hasn’t got the ground clearance of a true off-roader, so make sure you check the sills and underside of the car for damage

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The Yeti is available in either two- or four-wheel-drive versions, although the first is more popular on the used market thanks to better fuel economy and lower road tax.

It might sound a bit weedy, but the turbocharged 103bhp 1.2-litre petrol 2WD Yeti will suit most buyers. There's also a 120bhp 1.4-litre version if you want more oomph. Diesel options include the frugal 103bhp 1.6 TDI Greenline edition (introduced in early 2011) and a 110bhp 2.0-litre TDI.

The 4WD Yeti is surprisingly capable in the rough, and comes with a different engine line up. The smallest petrol is a turbocharged 158bhp 1.8 TSI, while the 2.0-litre diesel is available with 109bhp, 138bhp or 168bhp.

It is possible to buy a Yeti with an automatic gearbox, but it’s an elusive beast and available only on the 1.2 and 1.4-litre petrols and the 138bhp 2.0 TDI 4WD version.

The entry-level E model gets air-con, electric front windows and a CD player, but go for the S and you'll add alloy wheels, front foglights and electric rear windows. SE models bring dual-zone climate control, parking sensors and a CD changer, while the SE Plus gets touch-screen sat-nav and Bluetooth on top of that. Elegance editions come with leather upholstery, rain-sensing wipers and xenon headlamps.

Trade view

The 1.2-litre petrol model will suit most people, but there’s a surprising number of 2.0-litre diesels on the used market

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

The petrol-powered models aren’t as efficient as you might imagine, with the 2WD 1.2 TSI averaging 44.1mpg and the 1.4 TSI at 41.5mpg. The diesels are in another class, however, with the frugal 1.6-litre doing an average of 61.4mpg and the 2.0-litre 52.3mpg. It’s a different story again with the 4WD versions; the 1.8 TSI delivers 35.3mpg, and the 2.0-litre diesel between 46.3mpg-47.9mpg, so you’ll pay heavily for off-road ability.

It’s a similar story with CO2 emissions, the smaller petrol engines producing 149g/km and 159g/km, while the 1.8-litre emits 189g/km. The 1.6-litre diesel produces just 119g/km and the 2.0-litre diesel between 140g/km and 157g/km, depending on power.

Running the Skoda should cost slightly less than its rivals. It’s cheaper to service than the Nissan Qashqai and roughly the same as the Peugeot 3008, but is noticeably cheaper to insure than both – with models ranging from group nine to 19. We also expect the Yeti to have good resale values, too.

Trade view

The Yeti hasn’t got the ground clearance of a true off-roader, so make sure you check the sills and underside of the car for damage

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor

Like most Skodas, the Yeti scores highly with owners when it comes to reliability, but problems have been reported.

Both petrol and diesel engines can have high oil consumption, in some cases as much as a litre every 1000 miles. If the oil has been allowed to run low there could be engine damage. There have also been reports of turbo problems with the 1.2-litre engine and fuel-pump failure on the 2.0-litre diesel.

Some owners complain of poor quality paintwork from new, resulting in a patchy effect when viewing the car in bright conditions, and various rattles and squeaks from the cabin trim. Some owners have also mentioned random electrical faults, including an immobiliser issue that can leave the car stranded.

The 4WD Yeti provides decent traction in slippery conditions, but it doesn't have the ground clearance of a true off-roader, so check the sills and underside of the car for damage caused by over-enthusiastic owners.

Trade view

The 1.2-litre petrol model will suit most people, but there’s a surprising number of 2.0-litre diesels on the used market

Matt Sanger
What Car?'s Used Car Editor
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