Interior layout

Mitsubishi L200 review

Mitsubishi L200
Review continues below...

In this review

Interior layout

The interior layout, fit and finish

While hard plastics swamp the L200’s cabin and the dashboard design is quite humdrum, at least there are different shades and textures to break things up a bit (there are also patches of leather to lift the interior in top-of-the-range Barbarian models) and everything feels suitably sturdy. It’s easy to find a comfortable driving position, and only the 4Life Single Cab two-seater misses out on height adjustment for the driver’s seat. You sit high with a commanding view of the road and good rearward visibility from the large door mirrors, although you have to manhandle them to adjust the view on Single Cab and Club Cab models. The seats are quite sculpted and push into your upper back a bit, but they’re otherwise comfortable and finished in decent-quality cloth, or leather in Warrior and Barbarian trims.

The entry-level infotainment system is very basic but does take a USB input and offers Bluetooth connectivity once you’ve endured a fiddly pairing procedure. Warrior and Barbarian trims get more advanced infotainment, including DAB radio and a reversing camera via a 6.1in touchscreen. The graphics aren’t especially sharp but at least the system is easy to use, with a rotary dial to supplement the touch controls.

There’s also a simple rotary dial for the four-wheel-drive system that’s handily placed just behind the gear knob and allows easy switching between two and four-wheel drive and high and low range. It’s also used to engage the centre differential lock on Titan, Warrior and Barbarian models, while the 4Life gets a centre stack button for a rear differential lock instead.

 

Mitsubishi L200
open the gallery13 Images