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New BMW X2 & Jaguar E-Pace vs Volvo XC40

The BMW X2 and Jaguar E-Pace both look great and promise a sporty drive. But can they topple our reigning Family SUV of the Year, the Volvo XC40?

Words By What Car? team

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BMW X2 rear seats

Space and practicality

Front space, rear space, seating flexibility, boot

We doubt anyone will have any issues with the space in the front of any of these cars. All are within a couple of centimetres of each other for shoulder room, no one is likely to find their head brushing the ceiling and the front seats slide back a long way to accommodate longer legs. Although the XC40 has the least front head room by some margin, this is largely down to the presence of the optional panoramic sunroof.

Those in the rear will notice more of a difference. The X2’s roofline makes it the worst for rear head room, and rear leg room isn’t wonderful, either. There’s no more space for knees in the back of the E-Pace, although head room is better. So that leaves the XC40; it’s the best for head and leg room and has the widest rear seat area.

The X2 has the least storage for your odds and ends. There are a couple of cupholders in front of the gear selector, plus a tiny shelf. Look under the central armrest and you’ll find a shelf for your phone, while underneath that is another cubby with a USB port.

The XC40 is better. It has much bigger door pockets up front and there’s more space for oddments around the gear selector. Between the front seats is a bigger cubby that even has a removable bin with a spring-loaded lid. The rear door pockets are less impressive, but there are trays between the outer rear seats and the doors.

But it’s the E-Pace that comes out on top, thanks to the largest cubby beneath the front armrest, big cupholders, a handy shelf in front of the gear selector and decent door pockets front and rear.

The X2’s boot may look relatively small, but it has a huge underfloor storage area that can (just) swallow a couple of carry-on suitcases. The downside is that there’s a sizeable lip to contend with at its entrance, and there are no buttons or levers to fold the rear seats from the boot.

The E-Pace has the smallest boot. Although its load lip is low, it has much less underfloor storage, so it can accommodate the fewest suitcases. The load area is at least fairly square, with lashing points, a net and an elasticated strap.

Even with a spare wheel fitted, the XC40’s boot can accommodate seven cases with ease. It also has storage cubbies to stop your stuff from rolling around, plus the option of a pop-up divider to hang shopping bags from. Factor in a low load lip and it’s easily the best boot here, even if Volvo is alone in charging for a powered tailgate.


BMW X2

Including underfloor storage, the X2’s boot is deceptively big; it can take seven carry-on suitcases. Plus, it has a netted area and tie-downs to hold items in place.

Boot 470-1355 litres Suitcases 7


Jaguar E-Pace

E-Pace can hold the fewest cases, but it does have four hefty lashing points, a netted area and an elasticated strap. Underfloor storage is limited, though.

Boot 577-1234 litres Suitcases 6


Volvo XC40

The XC40’s boot is well thought out, with recessed areas to hold small items and an elasticated strap. Optional Convenience Pack is worth it for power-folding seats.

Boot 460-1336 litres Suitcases 7

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