Our cars: Nissan Qashqai 1.5 dCi - August

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  • Our Qashqai has a breadth of ability that has earned the respect of all who’ve driven it

    Our Qashqai has a breadth of ability that has earned the respect of all who’ve driven it

  • Qashqai's filler cap has to be released by an awkwardly-placed lever under the dash

    Qashqai's filler cap has to be released by an awkwardly-placed lever under the dash

  • The Qashqai has been on holiday

    The Qashqai has been on holiday

  • Qashqai's clever boot dividers and stowable parcel shelf make it easy to carry a variety of objects

    Qashqai's clever boot dividers and stowable parcel shelf make it easy to carry a variety of objects

  • Qashqai hasn't impressed everyone who's driven it, but we remain delighted with our 1.5 dCi

    Qashqai hasn't impressed everyone who's driven it, but we remain delighted with our 1.5 dCi

  • Opening up the maximum 1585 litres of boot space is the work of seconds

    Opening up the maximum 1585 litres of boot space is the work of seconds

  • Diesel engine in our Qashqai gives decent economy, but not much speed away from junctions

    Diesel engine in our Qashqai gives decent economy, but not much speed away from junctions

  • Mark's kids demonstrate how the Qashqai's boot divider can segment the load space with ease

    Mark's kids demonstrate how the Qashqai's boot divider can segment the load space with ease

  • A dash to the coast had one of Mark's passengers saying the Qashqai was 'noisy' - he disagrees

    A dash to the coast had one of Mark's passengers saying the Qashqai was 'noisy' - he disagrees

  • Qashqai is stuffed with safety kit as standard, and Acenta Premium trim adds even more

    Qashqai is stuffed with safety kit as standard, and Acenta Premium trim adds even more

  • Autocar's Qashqai (right) has the stronger 1.6-litre diesel, but our 1.5 version is far more refined

    Autocar's Qashqai (right) has the stronger 1.6-litre diesel, but our 1.5 version is far more refined

  • Long-run economy seems great

    Long-run economy seems great

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Nissan Qashqai 1.5 dCi Acenta Premium

Week ending August 27
Mileage 8153
Miles driven this week 543


Read the full Nissan Qashqai review


When you're going on a camping holiday, three things are paramount – boot space, comfort and economy.

Our Nissan Qashqai proved good in all three aspects when I took it to the Lake District last week. It took all of my stuff to survive a week in the wild (ish), it kept me comfortable on the journey and it managed the trip up and back on a single tank of diesel. Perfect.

The roads up in the area are also pretty narrow, but at no time did the Qashqai feel large and cumbersome, although the twists and turns of the Hardknott Pass did cause it some issues – it would struggle to pull up slopes from low speeds in second gear, but would rev too hard if I went down into first. Still, it was a small price to pay, because the light gearshift and easy clutch made making the changes easy enough.

By Euan Doig

Euan.Doig@whatcar.com

 

Nissan Qashqai 1.5 dCi Acenta Premium

Week ending August 20
Mileage 7610
Miles driven this week 105


Read the full Nissan Qashqai review


He’s an admirable fellow, Chris 

Lowe. Not only is he the publisher here at What Car?, he also owns a new Qashqai.

Being an observant chap, he’s gone for the refined 1.5-litre diesel version, rather than the rougher 1.6-litre version, as run by our sister publication, Autocar. In nearly every way, his is pretty much the same as ours.

What’s impressive, though, are the fuel figures Chris has been achieving in his Qashqai: he regularly achieves more over 70mpg, according to the digital dashboard readout.

I have mentioned in the past  that these instruments, which measure the consumption over a specific distance, can be notoriously optimistic, but even allowing for that these figures are truly impressive. My average is a lowly 46.5mpg, and I struggle to hit more than 50mpg on the dash readout.

A full account of Chris’s driving techniques deserves a longer review, but some of it must be down to his lengthy 32-mile commute from leafy Surrey to Teddington, taking in A roads and the M25. My car has a four-mile commute through the worst excesses of Hampton Court traffic, only enlivened by a brief 20mph spurt through Bushy Park.

The best figures we’ve recorded in our Qashqai have been when the car’s been on lengthy holidays, usually in the hands of group production editor Euan Doig, where it averages more than 50mpg, and the digital dash shows figures of more than 60mpg.

Our True MPG figure is 54.7mpg, so Chris has even managed to better that. I told you he was an admirable fellow.

By Mark Pearson
Mark.Pearson@whatcar.com




Week ending: August 12

Mileage: 7550
Miles driven this week: 95

The majority of the correspondence I get from readers relating to our Qashqai asks me how it compares to the old model.

My answer is always the same: it’s much better. The new model is more refined, easier to drive, nicer to sit in and quite possibly cheaper to run too. Our 1.5-litre diesel is particularly impressive. There’s just about enough poke when you need it (although it’ll never set the tyres on fire), and it’s incredibly smooth, especially when compared to some of the engines offered by its rivals. It’s reasonably flexible, the gearing is good and the economy, even in my hands, impressive – we’re averaging 45.6mpg in mixed use.

However, one or two people have remarked that the more homogenous look of the new model (from a distance it could be a Kia, or a Hyundai, or maybe even a Mazda) has robbed the Qashqai of some of its character.

Ours in Storm White manages to look elegant, stylish and eye-catching, but I do agree with them that it also has the feel of, literally, a white good. It’s a little, well, ordinary.

The old Qashqai sold so well on account of its trend-setting, chunky good looks – at the time there was nothing like it on the roads, a modest family hatchback that looked like a rugged 4x4. The new one is already selling well, if the growing number I’m seeing on the roads near me is anything to go by. It seems the majority of potential purchasers are either not fussed about how it looks, or maybe they’ve been on a test drive and discovered how much better it is on the road than the old one.




Week ending: August 6
Mileage: 7500
Miles driven this week: 100

What do the Porsche Macan, Kia Sportage and Mitsubishi Shogun have in common with our Qashqai? Very little, probably, but they’re all cars I’ve driven in the last week, and there is, on my route home, a roundabout that I’ve found to stretch the capabilities of all of them.

Now I’m not about to launch into gung-ho stories of tail-out bravery here. What’s caught my attention is the changing camber on my way through the roundabout, which, because it’s rush hour, has to be taken at some haste, even if not with your tail hanging out. About a quarter of the way round, just as you’re accelerating out, the camber dips away, which changes the steering geometries mid-bend and increases the load on the outside tyres.

The Qashqai manages this every day with almost no problem. Others give a feeling of being a little put out.

Just off the roundabout, there’s a massive transverse strip where two badly repaired road surfaces meet.

Taken in the Sportage, the car gave a little hop, as if it had lost all contact with the road. In the Shogun the reverberations through the suspension and steering wheel shook the fillings from my teeth and broke my spine. In the Macan, it was smothered, but a slight sporty shimmy was still felt and heard. In the Qashqai, the bump is seen, but intrusion is minimal, and driver control unchanged.

Considering that all three of those cars cost more than our Qashqai, that’s an impressive result.

By Mark Pearson
Mark.Pearson@whatcar.com

Our cars: Nissan Qashqai 1.5 dCi - July

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