Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross review

Category: Family SUV

Section: Performance & drive

Available fuel types:petrol
Available colours:
Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 rear right cornering
Add to shortlist
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 front left cornering
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 rear right cornering
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 dashboard
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross rear seats
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 infotainment
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 side tracking shot
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 RHD dashboard detail
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross front seats
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 interior detail
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 RHD infotainment control
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 front left cornering
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 rear right cornering
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 dashboard
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross rear seats
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 infotainment
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 side tracking shot
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 RHD dashboard detail
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross front seats
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 interior detail
  • Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 RHD infotainment control
RRP £22,545What Car? Target Price from£19,716

Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

There’s a 2.2-litre diesel on the horizon for the Eclipse Cross but, for now, it’s only offered with a 1.5-litre, turbocharged four-cylinder petrol engine. It produces 161bhp and you can choose it with with two-wheel drive and a six-speed manual or CVT automatic gearbox, or with four-wheel drive and the CVT auto ’box.

The six-speed manual gearbox lets you make the best use of the engine’s free-revving nature; it pulls strongly from 1,800rpm all the way to its 6,500rpm redline. However, the gearchange is notchy and an unforgiving clutch biting point makes it difficult to drive smoothly at slow speeds in town – it’s all too easy to misjudge things and end up stalling or wheel-spinning.

Where fitted, the CVT automatic gearbox rather dulls the engine’s performance. Floor the accelerator and engine revs soar while the engine drones in rather a wearisome manner. There is a manual mode that enables you to select one of eight ‘gears’, but the shifts are slow and heavily slurred.

Where the Eclipse Cross does impress, however, is at a cruise. The engine is quiet at speed and sends little to no vibration through the car’s controls, even when the stop-start system  activates. Overtaking acceleration is smooth, too, with none of the jerkiness that you’ll find from some dual-clutch automatics.

On the 18-inch wheels that come as standard on ‘3’ and ‘4’ trim levels, ride comfort at low speeds is poor. Expansion joints, ruts and other sharp-edged obstacles cause noticeable suspension noise and the occasional jolt that breaks the calm. We suspect that the smaller 16in wheels of the entry-level model might make progress smoother, though, and things do improve at higher motorway speeds.

On twisty roads, the Eclipse Cross leans more than some rivals and feels heavier when changing direction, exhibiting none of the tidy body control you’ll experience in the Skoda Karoq. If you’re looking for an entertaining family SUV, the Seat Ateca remains the one to beat.

 

Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross 2019 rear right cornering

Also consider

Renault Kadjar

2019 - present

A great all-rounder that matches the class leaders on most fro...

Mitsubishi ASX

2019 - present

Well equipped, but falls short of class standards in many othe...

Ssangyong Korando

2019 - present

The Ssangyong Korando combines versatility with agility and ge...

Seat Ateca

2020 - present

Great to drive and one of our favourite family SUVs<...