Used BMW 6 Series Gran Turismo 2018-present review

Category: Luxury car

Section: What is it like?

Star rating
BMW 6 Series GT front
  • BMW 6 Series GT front
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  • BMW 6 Series GT rear
  • BMW 6 Series GT (69 plates) right panning RHD
  • BMW 6 Series GT front
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  • BMW 6 Series GT rear
  • BMW 6 Series GT (69 plates) right panning RHD
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What's the used BMW 6 Series hatchback like?

It may well have been ahead of its times, but not many people liked the executive hatchback that was the 2009 BMW 5 Series Gran Turismo, or even bought it. So some will consider it brave that BMW replaced it with this all-new 6 Series GT in 2018, a car superficially similar but longer, lower, roomier and, most importantly of all, much better-looking than that original model. 

It’s based on the running gear of the highly successful 5 Series and has the same distance between its front and rear wheels as the large luxury 7 Series saloon, so promises great interior space before it’s even turned a wheel. 

The engine line up for the 6 Series GT is rather simple: you have the choice of two petrol engines in the four-cylinder 255bhp 630i and the six-cylinder 335bhp 640i, or two diesels, the 261bhp 620d and 316bhp 630d. 

Trim-wise, there are only two: regular SE and dolled-up M Sport. SE comes with sat-nav, air-con, alloy wheels and leather seats, as well as electric front seats and mirrors, while M Sport trim adds sports seats and an electric sunroof. 

On the road, all of the engine options move the 6 GT around with verve, with the fastest being the creamy 640i version, and all are smooth and refined, even if powered by either of the diesels. It rides well, too, even in the sportier M Sport setup, and its handling, though compromised by the car’s weight and higher body, is well-balanced, naturally controlled and comes with commendably high cornering limits. It’s no sports car, admittedly, but there is a little driver enjoyment to be had - don’t expect it to rival other sporting BMW machines in this area, though. 

Inside, the dashboard and its surroundings are pretty much the same as the regular 5 Series saloon, albeit stretched slightly across. You also benefit from the wonderful BMW iDrive infotainment system, which is nearly without peer in its simplicity and ease of use. The driving position is excellent, thanks to electrically adjustable seats and steering wheel. Visibility is good, and all GTs come with a rear-view camera. It’s well built, too. The materials surrounding the driver and scattered around the interior are very plush, with soft-touch plastics and piano-black and chrome trims and a sporadic and clever use of leather. Space upfront is plentiful, even for the very tallest, while two six-footers will be comfortable in the rear seats, even if behind a tall front passenger. 

At the back, meanwhile, the 610-litre cargo bay looks enormous enough to easily give credence to BMW’s claim that it’ll swallow four full-sized golf bags without the need to fold a single seat. It has a flat floor and a powered tailgate actuated by gesture control, making sliding awkward loads in and out very easy.

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BMW 6 Series GT front
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