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Used Dacia Logan MCV 2013-2020 review review

Category: Estate car

Section:

What is it like?

Used Dacia Logan
  • Used Dacia Logan
  • Used Dacia Logan rear
  • Used Dacia Logan interior
  • Dacia Logan rear seats
  • Used Dacia Logan boot
  • Used Dacia Logan side
  • Used Dacia Logan controls
  • Used Dacia Logan
  • Used Dacia Logan rear
  • Used Dacia Logan interior
  • Dacia Logan rear seats
  • Used Dacia Logan boot
  • Used Dacia Logan side
  • Used Dacia Logan controls
Used Dacia Logan MCV 2013-2020 review review
Star rating

What's the used Dacia Logan estate like?

Big space doesn't always have to mean big price, and the Dacia Logan MCV is a perfect example of that. This estate car is extremely practical yet a complete and utter bargain, especially when used. It's cut-price roots don't fly under the radar, however.

Initially, one diesel engine and two petrol engines were offered. The diesel, a 88bhp 1.5-litre unit, is aimed at those who do plenty of motorway miles, while the two petrols are better all-rounders – there's a 73bhp 1.2-litre and a 89bhp turbocharged 0.9-litre. The 1.2-litre was replaced with a 73bhp 1.0-litre in 2017. 

The only gearbox is a rather notchy five-speed manual, with a clunky, long throw; there's no automatic gearbox option.

The Logan MCV’s suspension is focused more on comfort than cornering ability but rarely provides much of either. The ride is too easily unsettled at low speeds and over larger bumps and body control isn’t a strong point; the floppy suspension allows the Logan to pitch and heave over bumps. This is particularly noticeable in Stepway models, which sit higher off the ground. No Logan MCV ever feels unstable, but there’s a lot of body lean and grip runs out earlier than it does in many rivals.

The steering is inconsistently weighted and rather vague. Combine this with the car’s tendency to be blown around by crosswinds, and you’ll find you need to make a fair few corrections to keep it in a straight line at motorway speeds.

Inside, the driver’s seat itself isn’t particularly supportive; it feels quite flat at the base and lets you roll around too much in tight bends. The pedals line up with the seat nicely, though, and the climate controls are simple to reach and operate, if not particularly substantial in feel. The plastic components used on the Logan’s dash are structurally sturdy but, as they already looked low-rent on the old-generation Clio that they’re borrowed from, they appear decidedly cheap these days. You won’t find any soft-touch surfaces. 

Passenger and boot space are the Logan’s strongest suits. Despite being essentially an elongated version of Dacia’s Sandero small car, the Logan MCV’s front seats offer tall adults plenty of head and leg room.