Used Hyundai ix35 2009-2015

Used Hyundai ix35 2009-2015 review

What is it like?

(2009 - 2015)
Review continues below...

What's the used Hyundai ix35 4x4 like?

Some people might take a look at the Hyundai ix35 and think it’s just another family SUV. It's one with a small claim to fame, though: it enjoyed a starring role in the hit BBC TV series Doctor Foster, as the car driven by the show’s eponymous hero. Aside from its fleeting time in the limelight, the ix35 is a well-equipped, reasonably inexpensive and fairly spacious family car that should be pretty dependable, too.

The engine range powering the ix35 is rather biased towards diesels – there's an economical 1.7 and a more powerful 2.0-litre, the latter of which represents the only way to get an automatic gearbox or four-wheel drive. For those who don’t cover many miles, though, there’s also a 1.6-litre petrol. The 1.7 diesel is the quietest engine in the ix35 but isn't very powerful. This means you need to rev it harder on faster roads than you do the the bigger 2.0 diesel, which rather erodes its greater refinement. The 1.6 petrol, meanwhile, is boomy and – because it doesn't have the torque of the diesels – you need to change gear frequently to maintain speed.

Some might find that the ride is a bit too firm while driving around town, and it’s true that the ix35 does have a stiffer ride than some rivals to cope with body roll in corners. However, while things settle down as speed increases, you will hear more suspension noise over expansion joints and potholes than you might like to.

Unlike more polished rivals such as the Volkswagen Tiguan and Skoda Yeti, the steering on the ix35 might take some getting used to. That's because it’s very sharp for the first few degrees of movement, but quite slow thereafter. What this means in reality is that, when you’re on the motorway, all it takes to change lanes is a slight steering input. However, when you’re on a country lane, you’ll find yourself having to use more steering lock when taking bends.

Space up front is fine for two adults, and examples fitted with the panoramic glass roof feel quite airy. Rear-seat passengers are well catered for in terms of leg room, but head room can be an issue for taller people. There’s also a rising waistline to contend with – the high-set windows limits the ability of younger children to see out of the car. The boot is big for the class, though, and there’s no load lip to have to deal with. However, the rear seats don’t fold flat, so bear that in mind when you need to transport flatpack furniture.

Equipment levels are very generous – even entry-level S gets air conditioning, alloy wheels, a height adjustable driver’s seat, electrically adjustable and heated door mirrors and Bluetooth phone connectivity. Style models (later renamed SE after the facelift) come with driver’s-side lumbar support, cruise control, rear parking sensors and heated front and rear seats. Top-of-the-range Premium has a part leather interior, automatic lights and wipers, climate control and a panoramic glass roof.

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