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Renault Laguna Estate (94 - 01) review

(1994 - 2001)
Renault Laguna Estate (94 - 01)
Review continues below...

Which used Renault Laguna estate should I buy?

Seven-seat versions are scarce and those extra two seats eat into the boot space, so we'd stick with five-seaters.

That decided, the 1.9 turbodiesel, available from the car's 1999 face-lift, is the pick of the range. It pulls hard from low revs, is acceptably smooth and very economical. Otherwise, the 1.8 and 2.0 petrol motors are both fine. We'd give the 1.6 a miss because it struggles when the car is full.

All models from 1999 have a decent amount of equipment, including anti-lock brakes, front and side airbags and remote central locking. The RT model is the cheapest but it's worth looking for the Alize, where air-con is standard. Top-level models are RXE and Monaco - they're rare, but worth having if fairly priced.

Buy privately or from independent used-car traders, and go for models with a manual gearbox. It may be sloppy but it's still the best bet as the autos are notoriously unreliable.

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Which used Renault Laguna estate should I buy?

Seven-seat versions are scarce and those extra two seats eat into the boot space, so we'd stick with five-seaters.

That decided, the 1.9 turbodiesel, available from the car's 1999 face-lift, is the pick of the range. It pulls hard from low revs, is acceptably smooth and very economical. Otherwise, the 1.8 and 2.0 petrol motors are both fine. We'd give the 1.6 a miss because it struggles when the car is full.

All models from 1999 have a decent amount of equipment, including anti-lock brakes, front and side airbags and remote central locking. The RT model is the cheapest but it's worth looking for the Alize, where air-con is standard. Top-level models are RXE and Monaco - they're rare, but worth having if fairly priced.

Buy privately or from independent used-car traders, and go for models with a manual gearbox. It may be sloppy but it's still the best bet as the autos are notoriously unreliable.

For all the latest reviews, advice and new car deals, sign up to the What Car? newsletter here