Seat Tarraco review

Category: Large SUV

Section: Costs & verdict

Available fuel types:diesel, petrol
Available colours:
Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD infotainment
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  • Seat Tarraco 2021 front cornering shot
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 rear cornering shot
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD dashboard
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 rear seats
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD infotainment
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 front left tracking shot
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD front seat
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD third row
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD boot open
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 front end detail
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 front cornering shot
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 rear cornering shot
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD dashboard
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 rear seats
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD infotainment
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 front left tracking shot
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD front seat
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD third row
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD boot open
  • Seat Tarraco 2021 front end detail
RRP £29,140What Car? Target Price from£24,320
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Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Costs, insurance groups, MPG and CO2

The Tarraco's starting price is a lot more expensive than that of the Citroën C5 Aircross, Mazda CX-5 and Skoda Kodiaq, and roughly the same as the Peugeot 5008's. It's competitively equipped, though (see below for more on that). The trouble is it's also predicted to depreciate a bit quicker than some rivals, including all of the above – the CX-5, by the way, has some of the best resale values in the large SUV class.  

That may mean it's not always the most competitive on PCP finance, but that also depends on what finance deals are available at the time  – check out deals pages to make sure.

Also, the Tarraco’s official fuel economy and CO2 figures aren’t as appealing as the equivalent C5 Aircross's and 5008’s, but they are in line with most other rivals. For the best company car tax, though, look instead at plug-in hybrids, such as the Ford Kuga PHEV

Equipment, options and extras

You can't add options to the Tarraco but they all come bundled full of kit, including the entry-level SE trim, which is our favourite. It comes with 17in alloy wheels, three-zone climate control, automatic lights and wipers, metallic paint, power-folding door mirrors, and we've already discussed in previous sections the decent level of infotainment features, the LED headlights and the rear parking sensors that come as standard.

We reckon it’s only worth upgrading to SE Technology trim if you must have in-built sat-nav and a bigger infotainment screen (see the infotainment section for more details) because its only other additions are privacy glass and 18in alloy wheels. 

FR trim has some nice additions including keyless entry, adaptive cruise control and a powered tailgate to go with the sporty styling additions, as well as electrically operated sports seats; it's worth thinking about if you don't mind a slightly firmer ride brought about by its bigger 19in alloy wheels. Any trim above that will have most of the equipment bases covered, but will also be quite expensive.

Seat Tarraco 2021 RHD infotainment

Reliability

The Tarraco didn't appear in the 2020 What Car? Reliability Survey because the sample size was too small, but, as a brand, Seat finished 19th out of the 31 brands scrutinised. That's better than Land Rover (bottom overall) and Peugeot , but below key rivals including Citroën, Ford, Hyundai, Kia, Mazda and Skoda.

If anything does go wrong, you are covered by a three-year/60,000-mile manufacturer’s warranty; this is okay, but nowhere near as comprehensive as Kia’s industry-leading warranty, which covers you for up to seven years/ 100,000 miles.

Safety and security

Safety experts Euro NCAP awarded the Tarraco the full five-star crash test rating, and it's pretty good in the categories looked at. For example, adult protection was similarly good to the Volvo XC40’s, which is one of the safest cars in the class. Child occupancy protection wasn't as good as the XC40's, though, but it proved safer for kids in the back than the CX-5.

It comes with lots of kit to help you avoid an accident in the first place, with automatic emergency braking (AEB), lane-keeping assistance, eCall emergency response and a driver drowsiness monitor all standard across the range. Blind spot detection isn't available, though, and that's a feature offered by a lot of the competition. 

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Overview

There is a lot to like about the Seat Tarraco. It’s one of the better cars in the class to drive if you like something that feels a bit sporty, it's really generously equipped and it has a very good safety rating, if not the best in the class. But it isn’t as versatile as the very best large SUVs both in terms of space in its rear-most seats and its boot. There are cheaper alternatives, for private buyers and company car users alike.

  • Composed handling
  • Punchy 1.5 TSI 150 petrol engine
  • Very well equipped
  • Cramped third row seats
  • Firm ride – especially with larger wheels fitted
  • Not the cheapest car in the class

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