Used Infiniti Q50 2014-present review

Category: Executive car

Section: What is it like?

Used Infiniti Q50 14-present
  • Used Infiniti Q50 14-present
  • Used Infiniti Q50 14-present
  • Used Infiniti Q50 14-present
  • Used Infiniti Q50 14-present
  • Used Infiniti Q50 14-present
  • Used Infiniti Q50 14-present
  • Used Infiniti Q50 14-present
  • Used Infiniti Q50 14-present
  • Used Infiniti Q50 14-present
  • Used Infiniti Q50 14-present

What's the used Infiniti Q50 saloon like?

If you were shopping for a premium executive saloon, an Infiniti might not be at the top of your list.

In a hotly contested class of some supremely good cars, whose badges proudly proclaim Audi, BMW and Mercedes-Benz, not to mention Jaguar, the Japanese firm’s name might not be the first one that springs to mind. Worse, if you poke around underneath this Q50, you’ll discover that at heart it’s a Nissan – not a premium badge at all.

On the road, the Q50 performs well with the 2.0 petrol engine, even if it lacks the sort of flexibility you might expect from a turbocharged engine. The hybrid, on the other hand, is seriously rapid and reasonably economical. The range-topping 3.0 petrol is the smoothest and most powerful in the range, although its standard-fit seven-speed automatic gearbox is slow to respond at times.

The sole diesel in the range is unrefined by class standards. The engine’s clatter resonates around the interior and there’s a lot of mechanical vibration, even at low speeds. The standard manual gearbox is notchy and unpleasant to use, so we would try to seek out the optional automatic.

Dynamically, the Q50 also falls behind the best in class. The Direct Adaptive Steering system of the more expensive models allows you to alter the weight and responsiveness of the steering, but it feels fake and disconcerting. The standard set-up is better, but it still feels rather artificial. The diesel Q50 rides well, remaining settled much of the time, but the hybrid has an uncomfortably firm, jarring ride.

Inside is a good driving position and a dashboard that sticks out for its dual screens: one 7.0in and the other 8.0in. By default, the top screen deals mostly with sat-nav and parking cameras, while the lower one controls other functions, including the Infiniti Drive Mode Selector. The rest of the interior is a bit clunky, though, with too many buttons dotted around and not enough flair to its design.