Used Land Rover Range Rover Evoque 2011-2019 review

Category: Family SUV

Section: What is it like?

Used Range Rover Evoque 2011-present
  • Used Range Rover Evoque 2011-present
  • Range Rover Evoque rear seats
  • Used Range Rover Evoque 2011-present
  • Used Range Rover Evoque 2011-present
  • Used Range Rover Evoque 2011-present
  • Used Range Rover Evoque 2011-present
  • Range Rover Evoque Convertible vs Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet
  • Used Range Rover Evoque 2011-present
  • Range Rover Evoque rear seats
  • Used Range Rover Evoque 2011-present
  • Used Range Rover Evoque 2011-present
  • Used Range Rover Evoque 2011-present
  • Used Range Rover Evoque 2011-present
  • Range Rover Evoque Convertible vs Mercedes C-Class Cabriolet
Used Land Rover Range Rover Evoque 2011-2019 review
Star rating

What's the used Land Rover Range Rover Evoque 4x4 like?

If we were to name one of the most desirable used cars on the market today, the Range Rover Evoque would be a top contender. And it's easy to understand why; it's a good-looking SUV that provides much of the practicality of a family car, the high driving position people want, plenty of standard kit and the desirability of a premium badge. The fact that you can now buy an early example for a third of the price of a new Evoque (which, incidentally, has similar looks) is just the icing on the cake.   

The performance of the Evoque has always been good rather than stunning. All engines are turbocharged four-cylinder lumps, the majority being diesels of 2.2-litre capacity in pre-2015 versions or more efficient 2.0-litre units thereafter. The range kicked off with a front-wheel drive 148bhp eD4 and four-wheel drive TD4, followed by a 187bhp SD4. Post-2015 2.0-litre versions come in 148bhp eD4 and 178bhp TD4 flavours. The lone petrol is a 237bhp 2.0-litre that remained unchanged throughout.

Prestige has bigger 19in alloys, Oxford leather seats, xenon headlights, sat-nav, a reversing camera, front parking sensors and auto lights and wipers. Dynamic is more of a sporting design package, with the major differences being 20in alloys and adaptive suspension. These last two trims could have had an optional Lux pack added with an electric tailgate, panoramic glass roof, an upgraded 825w Meridian audio system, surround-view camera system and blind spot monitoring.

After the 2015 revisions, Pure became SE but gained a revised infotainment system with a DAB radio, lane departure warning and automatic emergency braking, automatic lights and wipers plus front parking sensors. As ever, you'd need to get the Tech version for sat-nav. HSE Dynamic and HSE Dynamic Lux are much like the previous Dynamic and Dynamic with the optional Lux pack, while range-topping Autobiography really upped the ante spec-wise, with adaptive LED headlights, heated and cooled front seats, heated rear seats, Windsor leather seat trim and 14-way electric front seat adjustment.

To drive, the Evoque is dynamically good enough for most tastes and is a handy size for those that have to park in tight city streets. However, while the quick steering means fewer turns are needed to slot it into a bay, it can make the car feel a tad nervous on faster roads, and the large door mirrors that aid visibility causes plenty of wind noise at motorway speeds. The ride is too firm when fitted with some of the larger wheel options, so we'd suggest choosing an example with 18in wheels to ensure you get a comfortable ride.