Mitsubishi L200 review

Category: Pick-up

Section: Interior

Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD dashboard
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD front tracking
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD rear tracking
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD dashboard
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD rear seats
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD infotainment
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 front cornering
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD left panning
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD front seats
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD 4WD selector
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD cluster closeup
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 loadbed open
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD front tracking
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD rear tracking
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD dashboard
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD rear seats
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD infotainment
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 front cornering
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD left panning
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD front seats
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD 4WD selector
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD cluster closeup
  • Mitsubishi L200 2021 loadbed open

Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

Everything feels suitably sturdy inside the L200, but its interior is dominated by hard and unappealing plastics. Still, the various shades and textures have a valiant go at improving the ambience, while Trojan trim adds a leather-wrapped steering wheel and gearlever. The Ford Ranger Wildtrack tops the class for interior quality, though, with the Ssangyong Musso not too far behind.

It’s easy to find a decent driving position, thanks to a steering wheel and seat that offer plenty of adjustment, especially on Trojan models and up, in which you can move the wheel in and out as well as up and down. Barbarian models add leather upholstery and an electric driver’s seat, but there's no option to add adjustable lumbar support and the L200's driver's seat isn't as supportive as that of the Ranger’s. Barbarian X models add swish suede inserts, giving them a unique look.

A simple dial to control the four-wheel drive system is handily placed just behind the gear lever. It allows easy switching between two and four-wheel drive, as well as between the high and low-range gear ratio modes. It’s also used to engage the centre differential lock that's fitted to Warrior and Barbarian models. The less sophisticated four-wheel drive system of the entry-level 4Life has a rear differential lock button on the dashboard instead.

You sit high up, helping with forward visibility, but the raked angle of the front pillars can be a hindrance in tighter corners and junctions, interfering with your view. As with all pickups, it's tricky to gauge what's behind when looking through the rear screen, making the rear-view camera that's fitted to Warrior models and above invaluable. Front and rear parking sensors are standard only on the Barbarian X model, and this range-topping trim level also has a 360deg parking camera.

Mitsubishi L200 2021 RHD dashboard