Space & practicality

Mitsubishi L200 review

Mitsubishi L200
Review continues below...
19 Oct 2016 10:21 | Last updated: 21 Aug 2018 09:50

In this review

Space & practicality

How it copes with people and clutter

There’s plenty of room in the front of the cabin, and generous storage, too, with big door bins, a well-sized glovebox, a deep central cubby and two cupholders. Club Cab versions have rear-hinged doors that give access to two seats, which are only really suitable for smaller kids – head room isn’t an issue but leg room is very limited and the vertical seatbacks also inhibit comfort. The rear cushions flip up to allow a bit more storage space behind the front seats. Double Cabs have normal rear doors and three rear seats where even taller adults can sit in comfort (though a raised floor means your feet are set quite high), a tool-storage area behind the seats and usefully large rear door bins.

The flat-folding manual tailgate is easy to operate, especially in the Barbarian trim that adds tailgate dampers where others get simple tethering cables. All models can carry just over a tonne in the load bay, which is a long, uniform space but for the wheel arches. The length of the space varies depending on the cab type, with the utilitarian Single Cab boasting a 2265mm-long bed, while the Club Cab gets 1850mm and it’s 1470mm for the Double Cab. All can accommodate a European standard-sized pallet. With sturdier rear springs, 4Life models sink less at the rear when loaded up. The L200 is rated to tow braked loads of up to three tonnes, or 750kg for unbraked loads.

The accessories range offers various options to customise the load bay, from simple plastic floor liners and tonneau covers to full, glazed hard tops that give the L200 an SUV-type look.

 

Mitsubishi L200
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