Subaru XV long-term test review

The XV spearheads Subaru’s counter-attack on the raft of mainstream, medium-sized SUVs. We’re running one for six months to find out how it stacks up...

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Claire Evans
2 Aug 2018 7:29 | Last updated: 17 Sep 2018 15:53

  • The car Subaru XV 2.0i SE Premium Lineartronic
  • Run by Claire Evans, consumer editor
  • Why it’s here To see if improvements introduced for the 2018 version have made the XV a worthy adversary to its many rivals
  • Needs to Get to work whatever the weather and provide comfortable transport for the family at weekends

Price £28,510 Price as tested £29,060 Miles 6847 Official economy 55.4mpg Test economy 35.9mpg Options fitted Quartz blue pearl paint (£550)


1 August 2018 – Locked in

Price £28,510 Price as tested £29,060 Miles 6827 Official economy 55.4mpg Test economy 37.9mpg Options fitted Quartz blue pearl paint (£550)

The XV has lots of redeeming features, but there is one really irritating thing that I’ve not been able to remedy so far. The doors lock when I press the ignition button, which isn’t unusual, but instead of unlocking when someone pulls on the interior door handle, they stay resolutely locked unless I switch off the ignition.

This isn’t an issue when I’m driving alone, but if I have a passenger who wants to jump out to open a gate or shoo cats off the drive, they can’t unless I turn the car off, which is a bit of a faff.

Subaru XV long-term test review

On a more positive note, commuting on the traffic-clogged M25 every day is slowly but surely helping to improve fuel consumption – being forced to drive at 50-60mph in traffic I’ve seen it rise to 37.9mpg. I’m aiming to crack 40mpg soon.

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