Used Ford Edge Hatchback 2016-2019 review

Category: Large SUV

Section: What is it like?

Used Ford Edge Hatchback (16-present)
  • Used Ford Edge Hatchback (16-present)
  • Used test: Ford Edge vs Kia Sorento
  • Used Ford Edge Hatchback (16-present)
  • Used Ford Edge Hatchback (16-present)
  • Used Ford Edge Hatchback (16-present)
  • Used Ford Edge Hatchback (16-present)
  • New Ford Edge vs Kia Sorento
  • Used test: Ford Edge vs Kia Sorento
  • Used Ford Edge Hatchback (16-present)
  • Used test: Ford Edge vs Kia Sorento
  • Used Ford Edge Hatchback (16-present)
  • Used Ford Edge Hatchback (16-present)
  • Used Ford Edge Hatchback (16-present)
  • Used Ford Edge Hatchback (16-present)
  • New Ford Edge vs Kia Sorento
  • Used test: Ford Edge vs Kia Sorento
Used Ford Edge Hatchback 2016-2019 review
Star rating

What's the used Ford Edge hatchback like?

In America, everything’s bigger – or so the saying goes, anyway. Which is why, when Ford needed a large SUV to compete in the growing European market for such things, it turned to one already on sale in the US: the Edge.

That said, relatively few versions were made available here in the UK. You can choose between two versions of the same 2.0-litre diesel engine – one with 178bhp, the other with 207bhp. There's also a choice of four trim levels: entry-level Zetec, luxurious Titanium, aggressive-looking Sport, which was later renamed ST-Line, and opulent Vignale.

Comfort is something the Edge does well, in fact; it’s quiet when you’re on the move, and the seats are broad and well padded, while both front and rear seat passengers get a huge amount of space to stretch out in.

The boot is huge, too, and it’s a practical, square shape. However, there’s no third row of seats in there; the Edge is strictly a five-seater – unlike the Kia Sorento, Hyundai Santa Fe and Skoda Kodiaq.

If you only need to seat five, mind you, the Edge’s interior is very pleasant. It feels solid and well built, with only a couple of slightly cheap-looking plastics marring things. Early versions featured a rather fiddly and sluggish touchscreen system, but later cars are far better, while the rest of the switchgear feels solid and slick.

For 2019, the Edge was given a facelift in an attempt to push it upmarket and compete with premium rivals such as the Audi Q5. This slimmed the range down to leave only the higher-end trims and brought subtly refreshed styling, as well as a new, more powerful diesel engine.

There’s also a lower-powered option, but those looking to swerve diesel altogether in favour of petrol or hybrid power will need to look elsewhere, because these options aren’t available on the Edge at present.

Regardless of which power output you select, you get an eight-speed automatic gearbox as standard. In the entry-level 148bhp Titanium model this drives the front wheels, while the 235bhp ST-Line and Vignale get four-wheel drive. Despite the difference in power, every version can tow a braked trailer weighing up to 2000kg.