Used Ford Mondeo Hatchback (14-present)

Used Ford Mondeo Hatchback 2014-present review

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Which used Ford Mondeo hatchback should I buy?

With a fairly chunky range of engine and specification options, choosing a Ford Mondeo can be bewildering. But in general, if you steer clear of the basic trim level and the more costly-to-run engines, you do okay.

The range kicks off with the entry-level Style model, which gives you dual-zone climate control, cruise control, alloy wheels and a Bluetooth stereo. That's not a bad selection of toys, but we reckon it’s worth upgrading at least to Zetec, which adds a heated windscreen, folding mirrors, electric rear windows and a ski hatch in the rear seats.

If you fancy a sportier-looking Mondeo, you could choose the ST-Line version, which was introduced in 2016. This gets more aggressive bumpers, larger alloy wheels and suspension that's lower and stiffer to improve the handling. Beware the effect this has on the ride quality, though.

The next model up is the Titanium, which is the most popular. This gets you sat-nav, automatic lights and wipers, and keyless start. Because it’s so ubiquitous, prices aren’t that much higher than the Zetec version, so we reckon it’s the one to have.

If you really want a Mondeo with a luxury feel, you could choose the Vignale model. This leather-lined attempt at turning the Mondeo into a true luxury car is lavishly appointed, but it was expensive when new and therefore vanishingly rare.

If you’re doing low mileages or want to avoid a diesel-engined car, the 1.0-litre petrol engine is worth considering, but keep in mind that it’s not that easy to find. You’re more likely to happen upon either the 1.6-litre diesel,or its replacement, the 1.5-litre, both of which are better bets and make ideal matches for the Mondeo.

Our favourite Ford Mondeo: 1.5 TDCi 120 Titanium

 

Used Ford Mondeo Hatchback (14-present)

Which used Ford Mondeo hatchback should I buy?

With a fairly chunky range of engine and specification options, choosing a Ford Mondeo can be bewildering. But in general, if you steer clear of the basic trim level and the more costly-to-run engines, you do okay.

The range kicks off with the entry-level Style model, which gives you dual-zone climate control, cruise control, alloy wheels and a Bluetooth stereo. That's not a bad selection of toys, but we reckon it’s worth upgrading at least to Zetec, which adds a heated windscreen, folding mirrors, electric rear windows and a ski hatch in the rear seats.

If you fancy a sportier-looking Mondeo, you could choose the ST-Line version, which was introduced in 2016. This gets more aggressive bumpers, larger alloy wheels and suspension that's lower and stiffer to improve the handling. Beware the effect this has on the ride quality, though.

The next model up is the Titanium, which is the most popular. This gets you sat-nav, automatic lights and wipers, and keyless start. Because it’s so ubiquitous, prices aren’t that much higher than the Zetec version, so we reckon it’s the one to have.

If you really want a Mondeo with a luxury feel, you could choose the Vignale model. This leather-lined attempt at turning the Mondeo into a true luxury car is lavishly appointed, but it was expensive when new and therefore vanishingly rare.

If you’re doing low mileages or want to avoid a diesel-engined car, the 1.0-litre petrol engine is worth considering, but keep in mind that it’s not that easy to find. You’re more likely to happen upon either the 1.6-litre diesel,or its replacement, the 1.5-litre, both of which are better bets and make ideal matches for the Mondeo.

Our favourite Ford Mondeo: 1.5 TDCi 120 Titanium

 

Used Ford Mondeo Hatchback (14-present)
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