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Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-2022 review

Category: Executive car

Section: What is it like?

Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-present
  • Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-present
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 dashboard
  • Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-present
  • Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-present
  • Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-present
  • Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-present
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 rear seats
  • Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-present
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 dashboard
  • Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-present
  • Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-present
  • Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-present
  • Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-present
  • Vauxhall Insignia 2021 rear seats
Used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport 2017-2022 review
Star rating

What's the used Vauxhall Insignia hatchback like?

Non-premium badged executive cars have had a tough time of late, as buyers turned from these large family-friendly cars into more practical SUVs and the like. But what’s not to like about a sizeable car with a big boot, decent equipment levels and the sort of used price tag you'd expect on a much smaller hatchback?

Welcome, then, to one of those very cars, the Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport. Insignia means a badge or distinguishing mark of office or honour, but it would appear that it isn’t distinguishing enough for a car name since the second-generation Vauxhall Insignia has ‘Grand Sport’ attached to the end of it.

Ride comfort and refinement are perhaps the strongest assets of the Insignia Grand Sport. On 17in wheels, it rounds off the bumps well and only the very worst broken surfaces generate annoying road noise. You won’t hear much wind noise, though, even at speed, especially if you can find an Insignia Grand Sport with the optional laminated side glass.

Under the bonnet, the 138bhp 1.5-litre turbo petrol is the cheapest engine but it still promises reasonable pace. Even so, we’d be more tempted to pay a little extra for the more powerful version with 163bhp, because it’s in effect the same as the entry-level engine but with a little more power. It’s flexible despite its small size and there’s only a penalty in fuel economy. The 2.0-litre turbo petrol is only available in top Elite Nav trim and comes exclusively with an automatic gearbox and four-wheel drive. It’s an expensive and thirsty option, though. Later models featured a 197bhp and 227bhp 2.0-litre petrol engine. 

On the diesel front, there is the entry-level 1.6-litre with 109bhp (in later cars a 1.5 with 120bhp). While you might think it’ll struggle in a car as big as the Insignia Grand Sport, it’s actually a flexible thing that is just about quick enough. It’s the cheapest to run but may struggle if you regularly have a full car. For that reason, we’d suggest going for the more powerful version with 134bhp because it pulls well from low revs while sipping very little fuel.

The most powerful diesels come with the 2.0-litre engine in two states of tune: 168bhp and 207bhp. Performance is brisk (especially with the 207bhp version) but fuel economy figures are disappointing when compared with similarly potent rivals.

Tech Line Nav models are the same as SRi Nav but look less sporty. Over SRi Nav, you get front and rear parking sensors and lumbar adjustment. It’s well worth considering if you want a few more luxuries.

Elite Nav gets LED headlights, front foglights, tinted rear windows, heated leather seats and a Bose stereo. It’s also the only trim that's available with the 2.0-litre turbo petrol.

The GSi version is the sportiest pick of the range, with Michelin Pilot Sport 4 tyres, 20in alloys, different driving modes, Brembo brakes and a GSi styling pack for the exterior.

Inside, you get plenty of equipment as standard and big, comfy seats in which to while away the miles. The interior feels well screwed together, but the indicator and wiper stalks have a flimsy twang to them and the plastics look noticeably cheaper the lower down you go. It’ll probably last the course, but it just doesn’t feel quite as classy as the interior in a Skoda Superb.

In terms of safety, every Insignia Grand Sport comes with lane departure warning and traffic sign recognition. A thoughtful touch, since some rivals only offered these as options.

If you're interested in buying a used Vauxhall Insignia Grand Sport, or any of the other cars mentioned here, check out our used car classifieds site here. 

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Vauxhall Insignia 2021 dashboard