Best family SUVs 2024: our favourite SUVs for kids and cargo

Want practicality, class and an elevated driving position in a relatively compact and affordable package? These are the top 10 cars you should be looking at – and the ones that are best avoided...

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by
Stuart Milne
Updated19 January 2024

Family SUVs are now the default family car of choice for a large number of buyers – and it’s not hard to understand why. They represent a huge bump in practicality over many hatchbacks, and their raised driving positions make many drivers feel safe and secure when navigating rural roads or urban speed bumps.

Petrol and diesel engines are still common, but you’ll find some electric SUVs and plug-in hybrid (PHEV) options, which make great financial sense as company cars.

Best family SUVs Kia Sportage Ford Kuga

So what is the best family SUV to buy, then? Well, having tested every family SUV on sale, our expert team of reviewers rate the Kia Sportage as the best family SUV on sale today. We’ve lived with one day-to-day and covered thousands of miles in one, and along the way we’ve found it to make family life as straightforward and comfortable as possible thanks to its breadth of abilities, all of which you can read about below.

But what else should be on your shopping list? Read on for our regularly updated current top 10 ranking of the best family SUVs available to buy new in the UK, plus the model we think you should avoid. You can read about each model in more detail in our full new car reviews, and search the best family SUV deals available, too. Alternatively, check out our definitive list of the best SUVs on sale today.


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Our pick: 1.6T GDi 157 48V ISG 3 5dr

0-62mph: 9.9 sec
MPG/range: 42.8mpg
CO2 emissions: 149g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 562 litres
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Lower-spec models are great value
  • Smart interior
  • Generous rear leg room and boot space

Weaknesses

  • Hybrid petrol engine sounds strained
  • Rear head room compromised with panoramic roof
  • No clever rear seat functions

The Kia Sportage is the very definition of a good family SUV. And that, quite simply, is why it’s the best car in the class.

For instance, the Sportage feels solidly built and plush where it matters, while all models have a lofty driving position to give you a great view of the road.

When it comes to space, passengers of all ages and sizes can fit comfortably in the front and back seats, plus the boot is absolutely vast. You can also fold the back seats in a useful 40/20/40 configuration, which is something that neither the Nissan Qashqai or Volvo XC40 can do.

Then there’s how much it costs to buy and run. Even though there are fuel-sipping hybrid and plug-in hybrid versions available, the entry-level 1.6-litre petrol model is more affordable to buy, yet it still offers cheap running costs and strong performance.

When combined with 3 trim, you get luxuries such as a 12.3in digital driver’s display, heated front and outer rear seats, plus electrically adjustable front seats as standard. And even though the Sportage is more expensive to buy than the Hyundai Tucson, we think it’s worth the extra because of its superior ride comfort and refinement.

"An intelligently designed centre console means the Sportage has plenty of storage space, and I like the generously sized bin under the centre armrest." – Will Nightingale, Reviews Editor

Read our in-depth Kia Sportage review

Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Long range and fast charging
  • Loads of rear legroom
  • Seven-year Kia warranty

Weaknesses

  • Shallow boot
  • Not exactly cheap
  • Slightly firm ride

We named the Kia EV6 What Car? Car of the Year in 2022, and the striking electric SUV remains a fantastic all-rounder if you're in the market for an electric family SUV. It’s proof that cars in this class can be handsome, spacious, good to drive and travel long distances – even if its price is a far cry from Kias of old.

The Kia EV6 shares its underpinnings with the Genesis GV60 and Hyundai Ioniq 5, but the Kia is the most fun to drive of the trio. Yet while its suspension is firmer than the Hyundai, some of our testers preferred the less floaty sensation. The stiffer setup does mean that cars like the Jaguar I-Pace and GV60 are slightly more comfortable, though,

The EV6's interior is very smart and user-friendly, while space is generous up front and there's limo-like leg room in the rear. The boot is a very practical shape, and large enough to swallow seven carry-on suitcases.

It's great to drive, too: it grips well, the ride is firm without being uncomfortable, and depending on the model you choose, the EV6’s performance is either decent or seriously quick. And the range is impressive, with our top choice, the entry-level EV6 RWD, covering 230-270 miles between charges in real-world use.

"A firm edge to the EV6’s ride means you’ll feel urban bumps, but it remains calm at motorway speeds. I found it holds the road securely, encouraging you to push harder in corners, which isn't something you can say about all electric family SUVs." – Dan Jones, Reviewer

Read our in-depth Kia EV6 review

Our pick: 168kW Premium 77.4kWh 5dr Auto [Comfort]

0-62mph: 7.8 sec
CO2 emissions: 0g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 432 litres
Insurance group: 41A
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Wonderful interior
  • Extremely quiet on the move
  • Great infotainment system

Weaknesses

  • Boot isn't huge
  • Rear space is average
  • Optional cameras not as good as traditional door mirrors

Genesis is a relative newcomer to the British new-car market, and is the upmarket sister brand to Hyundai and Kia. As a result, cars from the trio are similar, meaning the Genesis GV60 is based on the same underpinnings as the Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Kia EV6. And despite being the least well known of the three, it still forms a very compelling package.

Its ride strikes a fine balance between comfort and control, making it more refined than the EV6, with less lean than the Ioniq 5 when cornering. All models are fast, but we think the entry-level Premium model is best because it trades searing performance for improved range. So while it takes 7.5sec to accelerate from 0-60mph, it can travel 321 miles between charges.

Inside, the GV60 is by far the most plush of the trio and is adorned with a sensible combination of physical and touch controls, making it very easy to live with. Despite being shorter than its siblings, the GV60 manages to be fairly practical, although it doesn't have as much boot space as its EV6 sibling, and so finishes below that car here. 

Some GV60s can be expensive, but if you stick with the entry-level Premium model, the Genesis represents decent value for money.

"Unlike its rivals, the Nissan Ariya and BMW iX1, the GV60 has a small but useful additional storage area under the bonnet. It's a feature I wish more EVs had." – Stuart Milne, Digital Editor

Read our in-depth Genesis GV60 review

Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Longer range than most direct rivals
  • Great infotainment system
  • Comparatively well priced

Weaknesses

  • Not as fast as rivals
  • Audi E-tron is quieter
  • Tesla Model 3 has a longer range and faster charging

The BMW iX3, like many other electric cars, is based on the underpinnings of an existing combustion-engined car. In this case, it shares many parts with the equally impressive BMW X3. But developing cars in that way can leave electric versions compromised.

Not so with the iX3, though. By placing batteries under the floor, there’s no impact on boot space or leg and head room for rear passengers, and you can even recline the outer rear seats – something you can’t do in the Jaguar I-Pace or Mercedes EQC. The iX3's 550-litre boot can swallow eight carry-on suitcases, which matches the Land Rover Discovery Sport, but is one less than the Audi Q5 can accommodate.

Like the X3, the iX3 is great fun to drive, feeling agile and alert through the bends, which is why we favour the more sporting feel of the M Sport trim. Its 0-62mph time of 6.8sec is brisk rather than thrilling, but of more interest to most family SUV buyers is the range. Officially it will cover 285 miles on a charge, more than the Mercedes EQC, although we found 210-220 miles is more likely during our testing.

Don’t fancy an all-electric model? Don’t worry, because we rate the BMW X3 just as highly.

"Being based on the regular X3, the iX3’s interior is logically laid out and everything is exactly where you expect. I like the digital driver display because it's easy to read, but it's a shame it's less configurable than the newer version used by the BMW iX." – Dan Jones, Reviewer

Read our in-depth BMW iX3 review

Our pick: 2.0 B3P Plus Dark 5dr Auto

0-62mph: 8.6 sec
MPG/range: 42.7mpg
CO2 emissions: 149g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 443 litres
Insurance group: 24E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Stylish and high-quality interior
  • Comfortable ride on most versions
  • Comprehensive safety kit

Weaknesses

  • Lacks the rear-seat flexibility of some rivals
  • Fairly small infotainment screen
  • Some road noise on the motorway

In many ways, the Volvo XC40 is the purest essence of a great family SUV. The former What Car? Car of the Year blends the practicality, style and – of course – safety credentials for which Volvo is famed the world over. Just here, it’s scaled down into more compact dimensions that make it great for more congested environments.

Our favourite engine is the entry-level B3 2.0-litre petrol, because it has enough power for most buyers and keeps costs down. The driving experience is relaxed and comfortable, with an outstanding ride and a smooth automatic gearbox – you can no longer buy a manual XC40. It’s not as much fun to drive as the BMW X1, but it’s certainly quieter on the road. Plus, it has mild hybrid technology to help lower your fuel bills.

The XC40 comes well equipped as standard, although we recommend upgrading to Plus trim, which adds heated front and rear seats, a heated steering wheel and ambient interior lighting. As you might expect, the XC40 scored a full five-star rating in the Euro NCAP crash tests, coming with a comprehensive suite of safety features including an automatic emergency braking (AEB) system which can detect cars, cyclists, pedestrians and even animals. Low depreciation means good PCP deals are available.

"The XC40’s portrait-orientated 9.0in touchscreen looks and operates a little like a tablet, with menus that slide and swipe. I like the 12-speaker Harman Kardon sound system, too, but that's only available in high-spec Ultimate models." – Darren Moss, Deputy Digital Editor

Read our in-depth Volvo XC40 review

Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Extremely practical
  • 85 version has an impressive range
  • Comfortable and easy to drive

Weaknesses

  • So-so performance from entry-level 60 version
  • You'll want to add options, such as a heat pump
  • Faster charging capability limited to 4x4 Enyaqs

With a sub-£40,000 starting price, the Skoda Enyaq is among the cheapest family electric SUVs on sale. Yet despite this, it’s still a superb all-rounder – and its ‘Simply Clever’ features such as a compartment in the driver’s door to store an umbrella, double seat pockets, folding tables and myriad storage compartments make family life that much easier.

The interior is handsome and the controls are well laid out. And importantly for a family SUV, it feels top-notch inside, with materials that feel of a higher quality than in the more expensive Ford Mustang Mach-E. The driving position is great – not lofty like a Range Rover, but higher than a Kia EV6 – and the seats are comfortable for most drivers.

Tech is mostly good, and isn’t afflicted with the unlit heater controls that vanish at night as you find in cars like the Volkswagen ID 4. A number of interior design flavours are available, but we think if you’re choosing our favourite model, the 85 Edition, then you won't be disappointed.

Entry-level versions offer decent range – returning 208 miles in our real-world tests – but we think it's worth upgrading to the bigger battery you'll find in 85 models, which can officially manage 348 miles on a full charge. There's also a version with four-wheel drive, but we suspect most buyers will be fine with the rear-wheel drive models.

"Although there's no storage under the bonnet, the Enyaq's boot is very big. I think the optional Transport Package is worth having because it adds a height adjustable boot floor, nets and remote levers to fold the rear seats." – Lawrence Cheung, New Cars Editor

Read our in-depth Skoda Enyaq review 

Our pick: GLC 220d 4Matic AMG Line 5dr 9G-Tronic

0-62mph: 8 sec
MPG/range: 52.3mpg
CO2 emissions: 141g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 620 litres
Insurance group: 40E
Driving
Interior
Practicality
Buying & Owning

Strengths

  • Well equipped
  • Plug-in hybrid has impressive electric range
  • Spacious interior

Weaknesses

  • Slightly firmer ride than rivals
  • Stylish interior doesn't feel the most sturdy
  • Petrol engines need working hard

The Mercedes GLC is a strong performer in the family SUV class but it’s the plug-in hybrid version, badged 300e, which is particularly impressive, especially for those with short commutes to school or work, or for company car drivers.

That’s because it combines low company car tax bills with the promise of being able to travel around 80 miles on electric power alone – that’s further than pretty much any other plug-in hybrid on the market.

Away from the pragmatic, the GLC has a spacious and eye-catching interior with loads of on-board tech that's a big step up from the tough-but-dull look of some family-focused models. Our favourite AMG Line Premium car even includes special glass that insulates you from heat and noise – a welcome feature if you have a young family and do lots of long journeys.

We were able to fit six carry-on suitcases into the PHEV 300e, which has a slightly smaller boot than regular petrol-powered models. But there’s more outright space than you’ll find in the Audi Q5 or BMW X3.

"The GLC trades some agility for impressive stability, and I like that its suspension is softer than rivals such as the Lexus NX to deliver a comfy ride. It's quiet at motorway cruising speeds, too." – George Hill, Staff Writer

Read our in-depth Mercedes GLC review

Our pick: 450h+ 2.5 5dr E-CVT [Premium Pack]

0-62mph: 6.3 sec
MPG/range: 313.8mpg
CO2 emissions: 21g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 525 litres
Insurance group: 38E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Strong performance
  • Promise of stellar reliability
  • PHEV has an impressive electric range

Weaknesses

  • Petrol engine isn’t the smoothest
  • Choppy high-speed ride on F Sport versions
  • Takumi versions are pricey

Lexus has been building SUVs and hybrid models for years, but the NX was the first to be offered as a plug-in hybrid. But you’d be hard pressed to tell, because it’s a superb effort. As you’d expect, the Lexus NX 450h PHEV offers low company car tax bills and the best efficiency, while the non-plug-in 350h is significantly cheaper to buy, and is still very efficient by class standards.

Both versions offer a refined ride, especially if you opt for smaller wheels, and the driving position should suit most people. Indeed, those front seats are some of the best you’ll find in any car because they’re extremely comfortable, provide excellent support and have a huge range of adjustment.

The rest of the interior is a delight, with a superb attention to build quality and tech that represents a huge leap forward over Lexus models from only a few years ago. Space in the front, rear and boot is perfectly respectable, too, and usually for a plug-in hybrid, the NX 450h has underfloor storage for its charging cables.

The NX comes well-equipped whichever version you choose, but we recommend the entry-level version of the 450h+, called Premium Pack. And we certainly recommend the optional larger touchscreen.

"I like the physical knobs for adjusting temperature inside the car, which are easier to use than touchscreen-based controls. That said, the touch-sensitive pads on the steering wheel deal with more than one function, so it took me a while to figure out where to find things." – Claire Evans, Consumer Editor

Read our in-depth Lexus NX review

Our pick: 40 TDI Quattro Sport 5dr S Tronic

0-62mph: 7.6 sec
MPG/range: 44.1mpg
CO2 emissions: 167g/km
Seats: 5
Boot: 520 litres
Insurance group: 33E
Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Smooth and punchy engines
  • Good to drive
  • High-quality interior

Weaknesses

  • Plug-in hybrid battery range could be better
  • No seven-seat option
  • Firmer ride on S line and Edition 1 versions

The Audi Q5 is a stalwart of the family SUV class because it blends sportiness and usability with the upmarket look and feel many buyers seek. While there’s no electric version – you’ll need the slightly smaller Q4 e-tron for that – there is a comprehensive range comprising petrol, diesel and plug-in hybrid models. That’s in addition to the high-performance SQ5 and Q5 Sportback coupé SUV, which we’ve covered separately.

The best choice for company car drivers is the plug-in hybrid model, but for all round ability (whisper it quietly), the entry-level diesel, badged 40 TDI, is our top pick. It feels strong and smooth, and makes for an excellent tow car, too. Ride quality is good, but depends on the trim you choose. Here, the expensive Vorsprung is best, closely followed by the entry-level Sport.

Yet it’s the S Line that’s our favourite because it has superb and supportive seats, LED headlights with beams that constantly adjust to avoid dazzling other motorists – and the sporty look that’s so popular with premium SUVs. 

Space in the rear is a step behind the Volvo XC60, but there’s a decent amount of storage. The boot is great; we were able to squeeze nine carry-on suitcases inside, although plug-in hybrids’ boots are smaller.

"I found the Q5 to look a little austere inside, but there's no faulting its build quality and the solid yet tactile materials. These are first-rate." – Lawrence Cheung, New Cars Editor

Read our in-depth Audi Q5 review

Reliability
Safety
Costs
Quality
Performance

Strengths

  • Good to drive
  • Spacious in the back
  • Well equipped

Weaknesses

  • Interior quality doesn’t impress
  • Relatively small boot
  • Busy low-speed ride on ST-Line trims

Despite a raft of newer models, the Ford Kuga remains one of the UK's best selling cars, thanks to a wide range of engine choices, sporty driving characteristics, svelte styling and a huge dealer network.

That engine range encompasses (relatively) affordable petrol engines, a plug-in hybrid capable of travelling between 30 and 40 miles on a charge, and a full hybrid. It’s the latter that’s our favourite, particularly in racy ST-Line trim, because it offers the economy of a diesel without the requirement to plug in. It’s better value for private buyers than the PHEV and has a smooth yet punchy engine.

It has the lofty driving position buyers want, even if the space in the front seats isn’t as plentiful as you’ll find in some other cars here. Things are better in the back seats, which can slide back and forth to balance legroom and boot space. We managed to fit six carry-on suitcases, which is less than the Hyundai Tucson, but the boot is at least well shaped with no loading lip and is a good shape.

"I found the climate control really easy to use, with large physical knobs and buttons logically grouped together. The digital instrument panel is bright and clear, but it’s limited in what it can show." – Stuart Milne, Digital Editor

Read our in-depth Ford Kuga review


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And the family SUV to avoid...

Jeep Compass

Despite its high price, the Jeep Compass is nowhere near the top of the pack in a very competitive class. Unrefined engines, an unsettled ride and a cheap-feeling interior add up to make the Compass a thoroughly underwhelming family SUV. Read our review

FAQs

What makes a good family-size SUV?

Many people buy family SUVs for their ability to make life that little bit easier. That means when you go to view a car, make sure you bring the family, plus any equipment you regularly carry, such as pushchairs or scooters. If you have young children, make sure you can fit their child seats and check the car’s seats are wide enough to make it easy to fasten seatbelts across them. If you carry bulkier items, check how easy it is to fold the seats.

Family-friendly features are really useful. The Skoda Enyaq, for example, has an umbrella that stows in the driver’s door. But of equal use are the ability to disable the rear window switches, turn child locks off and on easily and deactivate the front passenger airbag before installing a child seat.

Can an SUV fit 7 people?

Larger SUVs are often available with a third row of seats in the back allowing seven people to travel, but the family SUVs we’re looking at here are smaller – and therefore usually only fit five. You can find out which are the best seven-seat SUVs in our definitive rundowns, but if it’s absolute space you’re seeking, then our list of the best MPVs and people carriers will be of interest.

What is the most reliable family SUV?

In our most recent survey of the most reliable family SUVs, the Lexus NX took the top two places – the 2014-2021 model and the 2021-present models respectively. The Lexus UX finished in third place. 

What is the best family SUV to drive?

If you’re looking for driving fun, then it’s the BMW X3 that will fit the bill best, with agile handling and punchy engines. The Porsche Macan is a better driver’s car, but it’s not nearly as family-friendly.

But if your definition of the best family car to drive is more about comfort and smoothness, then once again, it’s the Kia Sportage that’s our top pick.