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Used Aston Martin DB11 2016-present review

Category: Coupé

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What is it like?

Aston Martin DB11
  • Aston Martin DB11
  • Aston Martin DB11 V8
  • Aston Martin DB11 AMR Interior
  • Aston Martin DB11 AMR Boot
  • Aston Martin DB11
  • Aston Martin DB11
  • Aston Martin DB11
  • Aston Martin DB11 V8
  • Aston Martin DB11 AMR Interior
  • Aston Martin DB11 AMR Boot
  • Aston Martin DB11
  • Aston Martin DB11
Used Aston Martin DB11 2016-present review
Star rating

What's the used Aston Martin DB11 coupe like?

Aston Martin's DB series is its royal family, with the DB11 being the youngest member. It was launched in 2016, taking over as the brand's flagship grand touring coupé from the DB9 that came before it. Where did DB10 go? Well, that was a sports car built in only a handful of numbers for the James Bond film, Spectre. 

Back to the DB11, though. Under its bonnet sits a choice of either a twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 or a 5.2-litre twin-turbo V12. The former produces a mighty 503bhp, meaning it'll be fast enough for most. If not, then the 600bhp of the V12 will do the trick. As of 2019, this engine become available solely in the AMR (Aston Martin Racing) version with 630bhp. 

In bends, the DB11’s body stays relatively flat, and the V8 is sharper to turn in and it feels much nimbler scything through a challenging series of corners than the V12, or, for that matter, the Mercedes S-Class Coupe or the Bentley Continental GT.  It steers better, too. The steering is quick, but not so fast around the straight-ahead that it feels nervous at motorway speeds, and it transmits a pretty well-defined impression of the road straight to the palms of your hands. This supplies you with the confidence to know when the front tyres are either gripping or about to take you wide.

The suspension has adaptive dampers as standard, and these deliver a good spectrum of modes, from softest GT through Sport and Sport +. In its softest setting, the DB11 isn’t as pliant as the S-Class Coupé or Continental GT – you feel a little more shimmy over rippled sections of motorway, and a firmer bump across potholes in town – but it’s perfectly acceptable.

Inside, the driving position is spot-on. There’s plenty of adjustability in the seat and steering wheel, though visibility is limited by those stylish thick pillars. Fit and finish retain the best bits from Aston Martins of old. Soft, hand-stitched leather sits side-by-side with wood or carbonfibre trim highlights, and all that looks like metal in the interior really is metal, including the air vents, for example. Space up front is fine, but as you might expect taking in that rakish profile the rear seats are best reserved for tiny children or suitcases. Speaking of which, the boot is a little on the small side, although you can squeeze in a couple of overnight bags.