Ferrari Roma review

Category: Sports car

Section: Interior

Ferrari Roma 2021 interior dashboard
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 front right tracking
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 rear cornering
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior dashboard
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior seats
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior infotainment
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 front cornering
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 front tracking
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 rear tracking
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 front uphill cornering
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 right static
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 headlight detail
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 rear window detail
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 alloy wheel detail
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior driver display
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior detail
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior steering wheel detail
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 badge detail
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 front right tracking
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 rear cornering
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior dashboard
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior seats
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior infotainment
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 front cornering
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 front tracking
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 rear tracking
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 front uphill cornering
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 right static
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 headlight detail
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 rear window detail
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 alloy wheel detail
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior driver display
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior detail
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 interior steering wheel detail
  • Ferrari Roma 2021 badge detail

Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

It's fairly easy to get comfortable in the front of the Ferrari Roma, with electronically adjustable seats and plenty of steering wheel adjustment. The seats themselves are comfortable, if a little hard, and offer lots of support regardless of whether you’re on a twisty road or the motorway.

You sit much lower in the Roma than in direct rivals, making it feel sportier before you've even fire up that V8 engine. In fact, if you like the low-slung driving position of more focused sports cars – the McLaren 570GT or Lamborghini Huracán, for example – it'll be right up your alley.

The uncluttered dashboard comes at a price though. Pretty much every button you’d normally find there has been converted from a physical control to a touch-sensitive one, then placed either next to the driver or on the steering wheel. The only exception is the selector you use for reverse, which has been designed to look like an old Ferrari manual gearbox gate.

This is where we run into a problem. Touch-sensitive buttons might look cool, but we find them a nightmare to use. That makes the Roma’s interior annoying and goes against the ethos of the chilled-out grand tourer lifestyle. Even the big red start/stop button on the steering wheel – once a lovely tactile highlight of the Ferrari experience – has been converted into a touch-sensitive button that is not always visible. 

Infotainment-wise, the Roma comes with an 8.4in touchscreen display that features built-in sat-nav, bluetooth and DAB radio as standard. As with many of its rivals, including the Porsche 911, the system can only be operated through touch. Again, we'd prefer physical controls – the iDrive system in the BMW 8 Series Coupé, for example, is far better. 

As a whole, the infotainment system is frustrating to use, responding to your prods slowly and flicking through menus jerkily. Little things such as the delay as you turn the stereo volume up or down are irritating. Similar gremlins affect the generations-old system in the DB11, but the Roma is a far newer and more expensive car, so it's particularly disappointing here.