Lamborghini Huracán review

Category: Sports car

A theatrical masterpiece that delivers breathtaking performance. 

Lamborghini Huracán front right tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán front right tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán rear cornering
  • Lamborghini Huracán interior dashboard
  • Lamborghini Huracán interior seats
  • Lamborghini Huracán interior infotainment
  • Lamborghini Huracán right tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán rear right tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán front left tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán engine
  • Lamborghini Huracán badge detail
  • Lamborghini Huracán kickplate detail
  • Lamborghini Huracán interior steering wheel
  • Lamborghini Huracán interior detail
  • Lamborghini Huracán front right tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán rear cornering
  • Lamborghini Huracán interior dashboard
  • Lamborghini Huracán interior seats
  • Lamborghini Huracán interior infotainment
  • Lamborghini Huracán right tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán rear right tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán front left tracking
  • Lamborghini Huracán engine
  • Lamborghini Huracán badge detail
  • Lamborghini Huracán kickplate detail
  • Lamborghini Huracán interior steering wheel
  • Lamborghini Huracán interior detail
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Introduction

What Car? says...

We all know that, when it comes to movies, sequels are rarely better than the original. But when it comes to sports cars the opposite is often true. Take Lamborghini for example. The Gallardo, the predecessor to the Lamborghini Huracán, was a bit of a disappointment when it was first released, with a poor handling balance and a troublesome single-clutch automatic gearbox. 

All told, it took six years for Lambo to create a Gallardo that driving enthusiasts lusted after, in the form of the rear-wheel-drive LP550-2 Balboni. And now, it looks like history might be repeating itself. 

What you’re looking at here is the Lamborghini Huracán Evo and it’s essentially a completely reengineered version of the legendary Italian specialist’s smallest supercar. And, if history has anything to teach us, this is a good thing. Because, while the original Huracán certainly didn’t lack in raw performance, it was never the most exciting supercar to drive.

Now, though, the Huracán has inherited the 631bhp engine that debuted in the awe-inspiring – but limited-run – Huracán Performante, as well as receiving a number of chassis tweaks to notch the entertainment up a bit.

But that’s not all. As well as this four-wheel-drive monster, the Huracán Evo line-up also offers a 602bhp, rear-wheel-drive model, aptly named the Evo RWD. It’s lighter, does without the rear wheel steering system of it’s four-wheel drive range partner and is designed to offer a more raw driving experience.

Key rivals include the McLaren 720S, Mercedes-AMG GT-R and Porsche 911 Turbo S, against which the Lamborghini is competitively priced. However, the Audi R8 makes the Huracán look rather expensive, since both cars use the same basic underpinnings and V10 engine.

So, how does the Huracán compare with the best sports cars available? And which version makes the most sense? Read on over the next few pages to find out. And if reading this whets your appetite for a new car, our New Car Deals service is here to make life easy while saving you a packet. It has lots of new sports car deals.

Overview

The Huracán Evo is a theatrical masterpiece that delivers breathtaking performance. And and while it does look very pricey compared with the Audi R8, that Lamborghini badge, the more heavily tweaked V10 and the Evo’s sheer road presence will, for many, be worth the extra. Of course, if you’re looking at doing the odd track day or spend every Sunday morning carving up your local country road, then we’d advise you take a look at a 720S – it’s more involving to drive and has higher limits. But if you’re simply after a raw analogue supercar with a great soundtrack, then the Huracán should be right up your street.

  • General sense of flamboyance
  • Features a sharper version of the the R8’s V10 engine
  • Surprisingly easy to drive
  • Slightly blunt handling
  • Pricey next to an Audi R8
  • RWD is a bit snappy on the limit
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Target Price from £170,838
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Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

As we mentioned above, the Huracán is a fully fledged supercar, but hasn’t always felt as red-blooded as it might. The Huracán Evo, though, aims to put that right, and does so with technology that includes rear-wheel steering and torque vectoring.

Those systems - along with the existing dynamic steering, magnetic dampers, stability control and engine - are all integrated into one central brain, called Lamborghini Dinamica Veicolo Integrata (LDVI). The idea is that the various systems work in harmony to deliver the most responsive Lamborghini to date. 

Lamborghini Huracan image
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The great news is that you won’t be disappointed, whether you go for the rear-wheel-drive or four-wheel-drive version.

Of course, with up to 631bhp, that high-revving V10 engine dominates the car, pulling with real gusto from low revs as it rips towards the 8500rpm redline. Sure, you don’t get quite the explosive (if more short-lived) hammer blow of acceleration of turbocharged rivals such as the McLaren 720S, but we reckon the more progressive, elastic delivery of the Lambo's V10 is even more intoxicating.

The Huracán is quiet enough not to drive you mad when you’re on a steady throttle, but let it rev – particularly if you’ve switched the variable drive modes to the fully rampant Corsa – and it becomes a raging, popping and crackling symphony of exhaust noise. Any supercar fan is going to revel in that thrilling, addictive soundtrack.

The seven-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox is also meticulously well sorted, shifting smoothly and with quick-fire precision just when you want it to, even if it can lurch a bit when engaging a gear at very low speeds. For fast driving, you’ll get more satisfaction from using the steering wheel-mounted paddles to change gear manually.

All Lamborghini Huracáns feature the delightfully named ‘Anima’ switch, which allows you to toggle through drive modes and vary throttle, exhaust noise, gearbox ferocity, steering weight, traction control and – if you’ve added them – the optional variable dampers. Even in the most relaxed Strada mode, the Huracán feels appropriately sharp, but most owners will favour mid-level Sport, when everything steps up a notch and makes the Huracan feel properly incisive.

And, thanks in part to that LDVI system the Evo responds willingly to your inputs, whereas the first generation Huracán always felt like it was trying to keep you safe rather than give you the no-holds-barred supercar experience you get from a Ferrari F8 Tributo or McLaren 720S. Give the throttle a boot mid-corner and the four-wheel drive system – which has been tweaked to be rather more playful – will send the majority of the power to the rear wheels, allowing you to gracefully slide the rear end. 

It never feels like it’s going to bite you like a 720S, though, assuming you show it some respect. The RWD model, though, needs to be approached with caution; with all of its power going to the rear wheels all of the time, it’s easy to get the tail wagging on the exit of corners, and if you’re not quick with your inputs it can quickly get away from you. In short, it feels like a proper, occasionally spiky Lamborghini of the old school. 

The only real disappointment is that its steering doesn’t communicate grip levels and information about the road’s surface as well as the Porsche 911 or McLaren 570S. And that’s true of the RWD model, too.

The Huracán’s steel brakes offer good stopping performance and lots of feel, but if you plan on taking your car on track, you might want to upgrade to the optional carbon-ceramic stoppers. These offer much the same stopping performance as the standard brakes, but will resist fade for longer during bouts of fast driving. Just be aware that they introduce a rather firm pedal feel and are harder to modulate around town.

Lamborghini Huracán rear cornering

Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

The Huracán exudes a sense of drama from every angle, and that’s just as true inside. In the middle there’s a fighter jet-style starter button that complements the angular design of the switchgear, which in turn mirrors the car’s edgy exterior design. Even the centre of the steering wheel has a distinctive hexagonal design that’s continued on the air vents and instrument binnacle.

For all that style, the 12.3in digital instrument dials behind the steering wheel are easy to read and highly configurable, showing you everything from a full-sized map to your music selection. The infotainment arsenal was also updated for the Evo, giving the Huracán DAB, Bluetooth, the option of smartphone mirroring, cruise control, a rear-view camera and a slick 8.4in central touchscreen that replaces the previous car’s buttons and dials on the centre console. 

The central touchscreen controls the air conditioning, seat heating and DAB radio stations. It looks slick, but by eschewing physical buttons in favour of a touchscreen, even changing the volume setting is distracting on the move, because a button on a touchscreen is impossible to find unless you take your eyes off the road.

Lamborghini has tried to get around this by incorporating shortcuts: for example, you trace two fingers up and down the screen, or tap three fingers anywhere on the screen to mute it. It works in theory, but still proves difficult in  motion. It’s also massively frustrating that you don’t even get one cupholder (the Huracán’s Audi R8 cousin gets two). 

The Huracán's interior does feel well screwed together, though. Much use is made of soft-touch plastics, and the car we drove featured forged composite  (high-tech carbon fibre) interior parts to keep weight to a minimum. That said, the cheaper Audi R8 feels just as plush, if not quite as glitzy in its design. 

Visibility to the rear is pretty restricted in the Huracán because the chunky, raked rear pillars create big blind-spots. The standard electrically adjustable seats are comfortable and very supportive – you don’t need to add the optional hardcore bucket seats. 

Lamborghini Huracán interior dashboard

Passenger & boot space

How it copes with people and clutter

Clearly, everyday practicality isn't going to be the priority for anyone buying a Lamborghini, but it’s good to know that tall drivers will be able to fit in the Huracán. Mind you, head room isn't overly generous, so if you're long in the body, you'll need to be careful when getting in and out to avoid messing up your hairdo.

Otherwise, there’s a small glovebox and one cupholder, which pops out of the dashboard. The boot is a small but fairly deep cubby in the nose of the car, which will take a couple of soft weekend bags at a push. There’s no other luggage space (such as the rear shelf that you get in an Audi R8) behind the seats.

Lamborghini Huracán interior seats

Buying & owning

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

If you’re overly worried about costs, then you should probably rethink whether a Huracán is the right car for you. However, even supercar buyers want to know they aren't throwing money down the drain, and Lamborghini's entry level RWD model is competitive on most fronts.

It’s usefully cheaper to buy than the rival McLaren 720S, for example, and while it does look very pricey compared with the Audi R8, that Lamborghini badge, general road presence and more heavily tweaked V10 will, for many, be worth the extra.

We'd recommend going for the RWD Evo version; it's easily the cheapest in the range and yet feels barely any slower than the more powerful, four-wheel-drive EVO. It’s also the sweetest riding and sharpest handling Huracán currently on sale. Be aware, though, that while it may be cheaper than its rivals, it isn't predicted to hold its value as well against depreciation.

Servicing, tyres and insurance are all going to be seriously expensive, too, in keeping with this type of car. At least the Lambo is more generously equipped than many rivals, with leather, climate control, sat-nav and heated seats all fitted as standard.

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Lamborghini Huracán interior infotainment
At a glance
New car deals
Target Price from £170,838
Swipe to see used car deals
Nearly new deals
From £209,991
RRP price range £170,837 - £373,317
Number of trims (see all)4
Number of engines (see all)2
Available fuel types (which is best for you?)petrol
MPG range across all versions 19 - 20.6
Available doors options 2
Warranty 3 years / No mileage cap
Company car tax at 20% (min/max) £12,445 / £27,429
Company car tax at 40% (min/max) £24,890 / £54,857
Available colours