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Used Mercedes E-Class 2016-present review

Category: Luxury car

Section:

What is it like?

Mercedes E-Class saloon front
  • Mercedes E-Class saloon front
  • Mercedes-Benz E-Class Estate infotainment
  • Used Mercedes-Benz E-Class 16-present
  • Used Mercedes-Benz E-Class 16-present
  • Used Mercedes-Benz E-Class 16-present
  • Used Mercedes-Benz E-Class 16-present
  • Mercedes E-Class saloon '16-pres infotainment
  • Mercedes E-Class saloon '16-pres rear seat
  • Mercedes E-Class saloon front
  • Mercedes-Benz E-Class Estate infotainment
  • Used Mercedes-Benz E-Class 16-present
  • Used Mercedes-Benz E-Class 16-present
  • Used Mercedes-Benz E-Class 16-present
  • Used Mercedes-Benz E-Class 16-present
  • Mercedes E-Class saloon '16-pres infotainment
  • Mercedes E-Class saloon '16-pres rear seat
Used Mercedes E-Class 2016-present review
Star rating

What's the used Mercedes E-Class saloon like?

Not quite as large and expensive as the mighty S-Class, and not quite as common a sight as the compact executive C-Class, for many the E-Class has always represented the sweet spot in the Mercedes-Benz saloon range.

This is the fifth-generation model; it's the E-Class at its most technologically advanced and fit to compete with with a number of hugely competent rivals, most notably the magnificent BMW 5 Series. You can buy it as a saloon, as here, or a commodious estate, a nifty coupé, a cabriolet or a mildly off-road estate called the All-Terrain. That its adaptability means the E-Class can fulfil so many roles so well points to its sheer in-built engineering strength.

There are just three basic trims for regular E-Class models: SE, AMG Line and AMG Line Premium. Entry-level SE comes with plenty of luxuries, including alloy wheels, climate control, sat-nav, a DAB radio, cruise control, LED headlights, a self-parking system, heated leather seats and keyless start. AMG Line adds lots of sporty design touches, including bigger alloys, a sporty bodykit and a faux leather-wrapped dashboard. Oddly, it also gets you faux-leather seats instead of the real leather ones that feature on the cheaper SE.

Even the smaller four-cylinder diesels are smooth and quiet, helped by their standard nine-speed automatic gearbox. The E 220 d has the edge over the E 200 d on oomph and, seeing as its claimed fuel economy is the same, there seems little point in seeking out the smaller engine. The E 350 d has plenty of performance and is refined, but you’ll pay for it at the pumps. The intriguing E 300 e hybrid’s performance is only slightly behind the E 350 d’s, with an electric driving range of around 20 miles.

While that sounds fantastic in principle, the petrol engine is disappointingly rough; the handling is poorer than the regular E-Class's due to the additional weight of the battery, and real-world economy (with a discharged battery pack) was in the 30mpg range at best. At least the integration between the power sources is smooth. As with most plug-in hybrids, it perhaps only really makes sense if you do lots of short journeys punctuated by recharging. In some ways, the E 43 model doesn’t feel as quick as you might expect on the highways, or even the later E 53s, but the E 63 versions are real flyers.

The E-Class has an interior of rare class. It feels like a smaller S-Class from behind the wheel, and that’s a real compliment. The driving position is excellent, and the dashboard is logically laid out and adds a touch of style to everyday proceedings, especially if the original buyer opted for the giant display that stretches from centre console to behind the steering wheel.

Interior quality is one of the E-Class’s strongest suits. It runs the 5 Series close for quality and even matches the A6, yet it has a far more flamboyant-looking interior than both of those cars, which many buyers will appreciate. The materials used to construct the cabin are mostly classy and the buttons and switches, in the main, operate with precision.

Space is plentiful both front and rear, although two rear-seat passengers will be much more comfortable than three abreast, which is a bit of a squeeze, and the boot is an excellent size and shape with room for a week’s worth of holiday luggage.

The E-Class range was substantially facelifted in late 2020. Tweaks to the exterior styling included a new grille design and new bumpers. While the exterior changes are minor, Mercedes extensively reworked the E-Class’s electronics, allowing the firm to offer a host of new driver assistance systems, ‘energising’ comfort seats and its latest infotainment technology. The revised E-Class comes as standard with two 10.25in screens, for the MBUX infotainment and instrumentation, with 12.3in screens optional.

The revised engine line-up includes seven petrol and diesel plug-in hybrid (PHEV) variants across the saloon and estate bodystyles, variously offering rear and four-wheel drive. Outputs for the PHEVs range from 154bhp to 362bhp for the petrol units and 158bhp to 326bhp for the diesels.

Other engine options include the four-cylinder M254 mild-hybrid petrol unit, along with six-cylinder petrol and diesel engines, all of which now feature a 48V starter/alternator electric motor. The installation of the EQ Boost system has been tweaked to further improve fuel economy.