Used Mini Convertible 2016-present review

Category: Convertible

Section: What is it like?

Star rating
 Used Mini Convertible 14-present
  •  Used Mini Convertible 14-present
  •  Used Mini Convertible 14-present
  •  Used Mini Convertible 14-present
  •  Used Mini Convertible 14-present
  •  Used Mini Convertible 14-present
  • DS 3 Cabrio vs Fiat 500C vs Mini Convertible
  •  Used Mini Convertible 14-present
  •  Used Mini Convertible 14-present
  •  Used Mini Convertible 14-present
  •  Used Mini Convertible 14-present
  •  Used Mini Convertible 14-present
  • DS 3 Cabrio vs Fiat 500C vs Mini Convertible
Loading interface...
Share review

What's the used Mini Convertible sports like?

We like convertibles in this country despite our changeable climate, but it seems like poor value to pay full price for a new one when you can't drive with the top down. Instead, you should go for a used one, like this Mini Convertible because you'll get a stylish, well-made drop top with a classy interior filled with lots of up-to-the-minute tech for a fraction of what it cost new.

There isn’t a bad option in the Mini Convertible engine range. The entry-level turbocharged 136bhp 1.5-litre three-cylinder petrol is a particularly good one because it’s smooth in everyday driving, quiet and economical. The 192bhp 2.0-litre in the Cooper S is a bit livelier, while the high-performance 231bhp John Cooper Works model is a good laugh. For the economy-minded, there is the 116bhp 1.5-litre three-cylinder diesel that's very frugal and refinement is pretty good, too.

Cooper models come with enough equipment to get by, but the Pepper Pack improves things dramatically because it adds rear parking sensors, dual-zone climate control, a sports steering wheel and auto lights and wipers.

Out on the open road, the Mini Convertible is much nicer to drive than the Fiat 500C and DS 3 Cabrio and has a finely balanced ride that soaks up the worst of the bumps and potholes but is still firm enough that it doesn’t roll badly in bends. You’ll notice a bit of shudder through the chassis on rougher bits of road, but that is to be expected on a car with no fixed roof. The steering is just as quick as the regular Mini, although its 90kg weight disadvantage over the regular three-door hatch means the convertible model isn’t as agile.

Just like the standard Mini, rear passengers will feel cramped and the boot is more of a letterbox slot. Also, overall load capacity is heavily compromised with the roof down because the roof and its mechanism robs space. You can, at least, fold the back seats down to increase cargo capacity. Up front, occupants are well catered for, since there’s lots of adjustment in both the steering wheel and seats to allow even the tallest people to find a comfortable position.

If you're interested in finding a used Mini Convertible, or any of the other cars mentioned here, head over to the Used Car Buying pages to find lots of cars listed for sale at a great price.

Page 1 of 5