Toyota Mirai review

Category: Electric car

Section: Interior

Toyota Mirai 2021 interior dashboard
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 front left tracking
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 rear right tracking
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior dashboard
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior rear seats
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior infotainment
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 right tracking
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 headlight detail
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 filling pump detail
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior front seats
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior detail
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior driver display
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 front left tracking
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 rear right tracking
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior dashboard
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior rear seats
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior infotainment
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 right tracking
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 headlight detail
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 filling pump detail
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior front seats
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior detail
  • Toyota Mirai 2021 interior driver display
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Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

Design and Design Plus Toyota Mirai models have part-electric controls for the driver’s seat, while the top-spec Design Premium gets full electric adjustment including lumbar support. There’s a high-set centre console and good-sized armrests either side, making you feel sunk into the car and comfortable over a long distance. The steering wheel has plenty of adjustment to allow for an excellent driving position no matter what size you are. 

An 8.0in digital instrument cluster is standard, and while it displays plenty of information, it's not as attractive, configurable or easy to use at a glance as the larger virtual cockpit display you’ll find on an Audi A6. Design Premium Mirais have a huge 10.1in head-up display, though, which projects data on to the windscreen in your line of sight.

Shorter drivers will need to rely on the standard front and rear parking sensors because forward visibility is hampered by the high dashboard that obscures the bonnet line from view. Visibility is also affected by side windows that aren’t very deep, the relatively small and shallow back window and the thick rear pillars, although the big door mirrors help a bit.

A reversing camera comes as standard, but if the picture quality from the wider panoramic view display (available with mid-range Design Plus) and the digital rear-view mirror (Design Premium) are anything to go by, the image it shows won’t be the sharpest. A self-parking system is available if you go for the most expensive trim.

Night driving will be aided by LED headlights with an automatic high beam function that puts the main beam on for you if there’s nothing ahead to dazzle. The headlights you get with Design Premium are upgraded further and include an adaptive high beam assist, although our daytime drive didn’t allow us to test it out. We’ll find out if they’re any good in due course.

All versions of the Mirai have a 12.3in landscape-orientated touchscreen infotainment system with built-in sat-nav. Compared with the iDrive system found in the 5 Series, the infotainment system in the Mirai has a much less intuitive menu layout and occasionally laggy software.

It does have a particularly useful feature over the competition, though – you can throw certain functions across the screen towards your front seat passenger for them to deal with, just like you can with a Honda E. Thankfully, Android Auto/Apple CarPlay smartphone mirroring is provided to bypass all that if you don’t have an assistant to assist you.

A 14-speaker JBL audio system is standard across the range and provides decent quality sound, helped no doubt by the low levels of ambient noise. It doesn’t quite have the punch of the equivalent Harman Kardon system used in a 5 Series, though.

New car deals
Target Price from £49,995
Swipe to see used and leasing deals