Used Vauxhall Mokka X 2016-2019 review

Category: Small SUV

Section: What is it like?

2016 - 2019 review
Used Vauxhall Mokka X 16-present
  • Used Vauxhall Mokka X 16-present
  • Used Vauxhall Mokka X 16-present
  • Used Vauxhall Mokka X 16-present
  • Used Vauxhall Mokka X 16-present
  • Used Vauxhall Mokka X 16-present
  • Used Vauxhall Mokka X 16-present
  • Used Vauxhall Mokka X 16-present
  • Used Vauxhall Mokka X 16-present
  • Used Vauxhall Mokka X 16-present
  • Used Vauxhall Mokka X 16-present
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What's the used Vauxhall Mokka X hatchback like?

The Vauxhall Mokka X is an updated version of the Vauxhall Mokka small SUV, a car that proved surprisingly popular despite it being not terribly refined nor particularly good to drive.

Changes to the front and rear styling and a redesigned dashboard were enough to warrant the addition of the 'X' moniker to the Mokka's name in 2016, but the car retains the stature of the original and a lot of its underpinnings.

Engine options are 1.4-litre turbocharged petrol units in 138bhp or 150bhp states of tune, a 113bhp 1.6-litre petrol and two 1.6-litre diesels, with 108bhp or 134bhp.

At launch, there were four trims to choose from: Active, Design Nav, Elite and Elite Nav. As standard, the Mokka X came with a 7.0in touchscreen infotainment system, OnStar (Vauxhall’s 24/7 emergency assistance and concierge service), a DAB radio and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto phone mirroring. Also included were dual-zone climate control, cruise control and front and rear parking sensors.

In Design Nav form, the Mokka X gained sat-nav and a larger, 8.0in touchscreen, while the range-topping Elite models added leather upholstery and heated sports seats in the front. Elite Nav models gained sat-nav as standard.

The Mokka X isn’t thrilling to drive. Its steering is light enough to make town driving easy, but it’s uncommunicative and the wheels run out of grip quite quickly in corners. The car's handling is also a little vague, with plenty of body lean in corners adding to the feeling of waywardness.

Nor does the softness of the suspension reward the Mokka X with a good ride; it's unsettled over broken surfaces, especially at low speeds, and feels wallowy over speed bumps, while potholes send nasty jolts through the interior. Refinement disappoints, too, with more noise than you get in rivals.

Occupants in the front shouldn't have any problems with head, leg or shoulder room. Three adults across the rear bench would be a squeeze, but two will be fine, thanks to decent head and leg room. However, chunky pillars can make the rear feel closed in; this could be a problem for younger children and those who are claustrophobic. 

Both the Volkswagen T-Roc and Renault Captur have bigger boots than the Mokka X, and there isn't a clever folding mechanism for dropping the rear seats. You must move the seat base forward first before you can drop the back, although it will sit mostly flat when you do this. On the plus side, there's no lip to negotiate when loading up the boot.

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