First Drive

2017 Volkswagen Tiguan Allspace review

Seven-seat VW Tiguan Allspace has plenty of appeal. We find out if it lives up to its promise or is just an overpriced Skoda Kodiaq

Words ByJim Holder

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Volkswagen Tiguan Allspace

If you know the Volkswagen Tiguan, you won’t have to stretch your imagination too far to contemplate this, the Volkswagen Tiguan Allspace, which is essentially a slightly stretched, seven-seat version of the same car.

If you don’t know about the popular and highly-regarded Tiguan, then it is best described as an upmarket, five-seat and on-road biased SUV that rivals the likes of the Nissan Qashqai, Peugeot 3008 and Seat Ateca.

By adding the two extra seats to this Allspace model, Volkswagen is providing a more practical version of the car, hoping to lure buyers who want that little bit more space but who perhaps don’t want to buy an MPV.

What's the 2017 VW Tiguan Allspace like to drive?

The pictures you see here are of a disguised car, because our test was of an early prototype model. The final production car will be revealed early in 2017 and go on sale in the UK midway through the year.

As such, Volkswagen engineers were keen to stress that changes to the car’s set-up could still be made. However, it was hard to detect any deficiencies on our test route; despite its extra length and weight, the Tiguan Allspace drove much like the standard Tiguan, delivering a stable, safe driving experience at all times. It rode bumps well, remained stable in cornera and the steering was well weighted and precise.

Our drive was in a 2.0-litre petrol-engined car that won’t be sold in the UK. We expect the UK engine range to mirror the standard Tiguan’s line up, however, meaning 2.0-litre TDI diesels and a choice of 1.4 and 2.0-litre turbo petrols, and we expect to recommend the punchy and refined 148bhp 2.0 diesel for most buyers.

What's the 2017 VW Tiguan Allspace like inside?

Overall, the Allspace is 22cm longer than the standard Tiguan, with 11cm of that length incorporated in the wheelbase (between the front and rear wheels). That extra space has allowed enough room for the crucial third row of seats.

Versatility is improved yet further because the middle row of seats slides fore and aft according to needs, be that more leg room for third-row passengers or increased boot space.

However, the rearmost seats should be sampled before purchase, because space is tight and they are likely to be useful only for occasional use unless you are transporting small children; even the smallest of adults will struggle to go two-up in the back.

Elsewhere, the car is entirely reminiscent of the standard Tiguan. That means a neat, tidy and plush interior with a high quality finish. The driving position is well judged, with everything close to hand, and the seats comfortable.

Verdict and specs >

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