Honda E review

Category: Electric car

Section: Costs & verdict

Honda E 2020 RHD infotainment
  • Honda E 2020 front cornering
  • Honda E 2020 RHD rear cornering
  • Honda E 2020 RHD dashboard tight
  • Honda E 2020 RHD rear seats
  • Honda E 2020 RHD infotainment
  • Honda-E-2020-review
  • Honda-E-2020-rear-tracking
  • Honda-E-2020-front-cornering
  • Honda-E-2020-dashboard
  • Honda-E-2020-front-seats
  • Honda-E-2020-door-mirror
  • Honda-E-2020-rear-camera
  • Honda-E-2020-boot
  • Honda E 2020 front cornering
  • Honda E 2020 RHD rear cornering
  • Honda E 2020 RHD dashboard tight
  • Honda E 2020 RHD rear seats
  • Honda E 2020 RHD infotainment
  • Honda-E-2020-review
  • Honda-E-2020-rear-tracking
  • Honda-E-2020-front-cornering
  • Honda-E-2020-dashboard
  • Honda-E-2020-front-seats
  • Honda-E-2020-door-mirror
  • Honda-E-2020-rear-camera
  • Honda-E-2020-boot
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Costs & verdict

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

Even if you love the looks, don’t give two hoots about practicality and can live with a small range between charges, there’s still something that might put you off: the price. It would be easier to forgive the Honda E’s flaws were it priced in line with the Seat Mii Electric and Volkswagen e-Up, or perhaps even slightly above those cars. Instead, it costs more than entry-level versions of the Renault Zoe, Peugeot e-208 and Mini Electric

Given that the Zoe and e-208 are larger cars with much longer ranges between charges, and the Mini Electric has a plusher interior and a more user-friendly infotainment system, it’s clear that the only reasons for choosing the Honda E are subjective ones. And that’s absolutely fine as long as you know that you're turning your nose up at other electric cars that offer more for less.

Both versions come with an impressive amount of safety equipment, including automatic emergency braking (AEB) – a feature that isn’t currently offered on the Zoe or Mii Electric. However, as yet, the Honda E hasn’t been crash tested by safety experts Euro NCAP.

The 35.5kWh battery takes 36min to charge from 10-80% if you're plugged into a 50kW CCS public charger, and while you can use a more powerful 100kW charging point, the time won’t reduce because the E can’t accept any more than 35kW.

Plug into a 7kW home wallbox and a 0-100% charge will take around 5hr 15min, or if you get caught short and have to use a three-pin domestic plug, a full charge will take around 15 hours. 

Honda has a pretty good record when it comes to reliability, finishing 10th out of 31 manufacturers in the 2019 What Car? Reliability Survey. The E is covered by a three-year, 90,000-mile warranty, with the battery covered by a separate eight-year, 100,000-mile warranty with a guarantee that it will retain at least 70% of its original capacity during that time.

Honda E 2020 RHD infotainment

Overview

The Honda E is a car you buy because you love the way it looks. And fs you do so you'll own an electric car that's good fun to drive, well-equipped and relatively upmarket inside. Sadly, with such a limited range between charges, a confusing infotainment system, a high price and a tiny boot, it's objectively harder to recommend than many rivals.

  • Distinctive styling
  • Good to drive
  • Excellent standard safety equipment
  • Poor range
  • Too expensive
  • Miniscule boot
New car deals
Save up to £501
Target Price from £31,202
Save up to £501
or from £384pm
Swipe to see used and leasing deals
Nearly new deals
From £28,992
Leasing deals
From £359pm