Used Jaguar XE 2015-present review

Category: Executive car

Section: What is it like?

Jaguar XE
  • Jaguar XE
  • Used Jaguar XE
  • Jaguar XE 15-present interior
  • Jaguar XE 15-pres boot
  • Jaguar XE front leg room
  • Jaguar XE
  • Jaguar XE 15-present infotainment
  • Jaguar XE rear leg room
  • Jaguar XE
  • Used Jaguar XE
  • Jaguar XE 15-present interior
  • Jaguar XE 15-pres boot
  • Jaguar XE front leg room
  • Jaguar XE
  • Jaguar XE 15-present infotainment
  • Jaguar XE rear leg room

What's the used Jaguar XE saloon like?

The Jaguar XE probably isn't the first car that comes to mind if you're thinking of executive saloons. The sporty BMW 3 Series will probably be first, followed by its fellow segment stablemates, the Audi A4 and Mercedes-Benz C-Class. However, that doesn't mean the XE should be overlooked. 

This suave four-door has been around since 2015 and ticks many desirable boxes. It features a traditional rear-wheel-drive layout, plenty of driver appeal, plus all the style and equipment class buyers could want.

It’s good on the road, too: it’s refined on the motorways and the ride, though it can be a little on the firm side, is comfortable. True, there are others that are better finished inside and more spacious, but none handle as sweetly - if you’re after a sporty executive saloon look no further. Indeed the car’s best qualities are its fluent, consistent and uncorrupted steering, its balance and precision when cornering and its expertly judged blend of body control compromised against a mostly supple and quiet ride. On all of those fronts, it was for a long time the king of the compact executive class, perhaps only bettered by certain versions of the BMW 3 Series. 

Jaguar isn’t known for outstanding material interior quality and it won’t be changing its reputation by out-dazzling the likes of Audi and Mercedes with the XE. The car’s interior is nonetheless very pleasant, fairly luxurious and consistently well-finished. The black plastics and leathers can be a bit plain, but lighter and more visually appealing two-tone upholsteries are also offered. The car’s switchgear is all either grained or rubberised, and its instruments are pleasingly conventional and clear.

Occupant space for the driver is adequate, but snug rather than generous. A slightly high-mounted seat combines with a typically graceful swooping Jaguar roofline to limit head room for taller drivers.  In the rear, space is broadly competitive, although short of the standard of the most practical compact executive saloons, so full-sized adults may struggle a wee bit for knee and head room. The boot is a fair size but the Audi A4 and BMW 3 Series offer a little more cargo space.