Used Mercedes EQC 2019-present review

Category: Large Electric

Section: What is it like?

Mercedes-Benz EQC front three quarters
  • Mercedes-Benz EQC front three quarters
  • Mercedes EQC infotainment
  • Mercedes EQC interior
  • Mercedes EQC boot
  • Mercedes EQC driving
  • Mercedes EQC rear corner
  • Mercedes EQC driving
  • Mercedes EQC rear seats
  • Mercedes-Benz EQC front three quarters
  • Mercedes EQC infotainment
  • Mercedes EQC interior
  • Mercedes EQC boot
  • Mercedes EQC driving
  • Mercedes EQC rear corner
  • Mercedes EQC driving
  • Mercedes EQC rear seats

What's the used Mercedes EQC 4x4 like?

Demand for electrified vehicles such as the Mercedes EQC is so great at the moment that any discounts available are minuscule compared with those available on traditional petrol or diesel SUVs. But, if you're canny and buy used, you can easily save a shed load of cash on this tech-fest of an electric car, without even trying.

Like most of its electric SUV rivals, there's only one 'engine' option available and that's a 402bhp electric motor with an 80kWh battery pack. That makes the EQC more powerful than a Jaguar I-Pace and a match for the Audi
E-tron, although both those rivals have a more battery capacity.

A 0-60mph time of 4.9 seconds makes the EQC significantly swifter than an E-tron, but not quite as fast as the I-Pace, although you'd need to be a real speed demon or have a desire to outrun the hottest of hot hatches to really care. 

Comfort is more the EQC's bag. On the Sport model's 19in wheels the ride is mostly calm, taking the initial sting out of impacts with potholes thanks to a suspension set-up that's quite soft. Trouble is, this softness means the EQC pitches and wallows a lot of rougher roads. The Jaguar I-Pace's ride, by comparison, feels more controlled.

The I-Pace is also a better handling choice if you like to hustle through bends. Try to corner the EQC with similar enthusiasm and it sways about before running out of front-end grip sooner than you might imagine. Drive normally, though, and it's perfectly adequate, and the steering is light, precise and well-suited to motoring around town. Refinement is very impressive whatever speed you're doing, too.

Also impressive is the appealing look of the interior with its mix of large, high-tech screens, gloss black plastic, genuine leather seats (on all but entry-level Sport trim) and plenty of polished metal highlights. Build quality is generally pretty good, although it never feels as solid as the E-tron's because some of the fixtures, including the centre air vents and their plastic surrounds, are wobbly and a bit of a let-down.