Used BMW X2 2018-present review

Category: Family SUV

Section: What is it like?

BMW X2 20i front quarter
  • BMW X2 20i front quarter
  • BMW X2
  • 2018 BMW X2 20i rear
  • BMW X2 2019 right rear tracking shot
  • 2018 BMW X2 20i rear
  • BMW X2 20i front quarter
  • BMW X2
  • 2018 BMW X2 20i rear
  • BMW X2 2019 right rear tracking shot
  • 2018 BMW X2 20i rear

What's the used BMW X2 hatchback like?

Imagine you want an SUV but you want a little more style and you want it to be more car-like to drive. On top of that, you want it to have a premium badge. Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, to the BMW X2, a sporting sibling to the more practical and more mundane-looking X1 and X3 SUVs that also issue from the firm’s portals.

Its styling is certainly different enough to win it friends, suggesting as it does a cross between a compact SUV and a coupe, but it wouldn’t get far if it didn’t offer all the traditional qualities we’ve come to expect from a BMW. To that end, under the bonnet there’s a range of frugal yet punchy 2.0-litre engines: two petrols and two diesels, with a choice of a manual or automatic gearbox and a mix depending on engine chosen of front-wheel drive or BMW’s xDrive four-wheel drive system. The petrol options are the sDrive18i or sDrive20i, with 138bhp and 189bhp respectively, both with front-wheel drive. The most powerful 187bhp diesel engine is only available with four-wheel drive as the xDrive20d, but new buyers could have chosen between the 148bhp diesel as a four-wheel drive xDrive18d or a front-wheel-drive sDrive18d.

On the road, all the X2s perform well, with plenty of oomph at most speeds and, in the diesels, excellent low-speed punch. The eight-speed automatic is also smooth and changes gear unobtrusively. Approach a corner and the X2 shines, with well-weighted steering, high levels of grip and sporting handling that is safe and stable but encourages the keener driver more than most of its rivals in this class do. The pay-off for this is a ride that’s too firm. Indeed rough road surfaces and sharp-edged bumps will see passengers bouncing around in their seats uncomfortably, especially at low speeds.

Inside is a driving position more akin to that of a normal hatchback than an SUV, with a multi-adjustable seat and steering wheel. Visibility can be a little limited by the thick pillars, but reversing sensors are standard. The finish of the interior is certainly a cut above its rivals, though, with pleasing materials on display. It’s snazzy, and feels of a high quality.

The X2 has a fantastic infotainment system. All versions come with a DAB radio, CD player, USB socket, Bluetooth and satellite navigation with traffic information. The screen is a rather small 6.5in, but the interface – a rotary selector dial surrounded by a handful of shortcut buttons   – is wonderfully intuitive and conveniently positioned between the front seats. Upgrade to the Navigation Plus package and you gain an 8.8in display, wireless charging for compatible devices and a touch-sensitive pad on top of the rotary dial controller that allows you to input addresses using handwriting, as well as a head-up display.