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Used Range Rover Velar 2017-present review

Category: Luxury SUV

Section: What is it like?

 Used Range Rover Velar 17-present
  •  Used Range Rover Velar 17-present
  • Land Rover Range Rover Velar
  •  Used Range Rover Velar 17-present
  •  Used Range Rover Velar 17-present
  •  Used Range Rover Velar 17-present
  •  Used Range Rover Velar 17-present
  • Range Rover Velar front seat
  • Range Rover Velar dashboard
  •  Used Range Rover Velar 17-present
  • Land Rover Range Rover Velar
  •  Used Range Rover Velar 17-present
  •  Used Range Rover Velar 17-present
  •  Used Range Rover Velar 17-present
  •  Used Range Rover Velar 17-present
  • Range Rover Velar front seat
  • Range Rover Velar dashboard
Used Range Rover Velar 2017-present review
Star rating

What's the used Land Rover Range Rover Velar estate like?

SUVs are very much in fashion, and nowhere more so than in posh parts of towns and cities, far, far away from dirt roads and mud.

Car manufacturers have known for years that very few luxury SUV buyers take their vehicles off-road, so it makes sense for them to offer a car that puts style and on-road driving dynamics ahead of everything else.

We like the D180 version on the road so much that we gave it the What Car? Coupe SUV of the Year award in 2020. While its 0-62mph time of 8.9sec won't get you foaming at the mouth, it's solid enough in the mid-range to get you going easily in town or on a motorway. If you can afford it, though, the D300 is nicer, with more mid-range oomph.

The most powerful of the petrols (ignoring the P550) is the P300, with 296bhp. It's quick flat out, but there's less shove lower down than the diesels provide so you need to work it much harder. The lower-powered 247bhp P250 petrol version needs even more of a work-out, but still delivers its power smoothly. 

The ride varies depending on which suspension and alloy wheel option you have. Four-cylinder models with traditional springs work best with the smallest 19in alloy wheels as the ride can get quite fidgety on rough, pockmarked roads. Air suspension is standard on V6 models and has setting to suit your mood. Comfort mode has a pleasant wafty ride while Dynamic stiffens things up to improve the handling if you want to up the pace.

Buttons are mainly a thing of the past in the Velar because the dashboard is made up of two touchscreens. You get two rotary control dials on the lower screen – which deals with climate and driving modes – to control various functions depending on what is shown on the display. The screen above looks after sat-nav and media-related functions.

SE and above Velars get a 12.3in configurable driver display, which includes the speedo and rev counter. It’s similar to Audi’s virtual cockpit except it’s not quite as slick. One major technology omission is Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone mirroring. There is a Land Rover app that gives you some mirroring capabilities but it’s awkward to use.