Maserati GranTurismo review

Category: Coupé

The Maserati GranTurismo offers excellent performance but some of its rivals sound better

Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo front cornering
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo front cornering
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo rear cornering
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo dashboard
  • Maserati GranTurismo interior back seats
  • Maserati GranTurismo interior driver display
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo right driving
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo front left driving
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo front cornering
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo rear cornering
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo rear right driving
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo front right static
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo rear right static
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo alloy wheel
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo badge
  • Maserati GranTurismo interior front seats
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo infotainment touchscreen
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo dashboard clock
  • Maserati GranTurismo interior detail
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo front cornering
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo rear cornering
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo dashboard
  • Maserati GranTurismo interior back seats
  • Maserati GranTurismo interior driver display
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo right driving
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo front left driving
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo front cornering
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo rear cornering
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo rear right driving
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo front right static
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo rear right static
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo alloy wheel
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo badge
  • Maserati GranTurismo interior front seats
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo infotainment touchscreen
  • Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo dashboard clock
  • Maserati GranTurismo interior detail
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Introduction

What Car? says...

When choosing a meal, it can be tricky to decide whether to go for a healthy or unhealthy option. And buyers lucky enough to be considering the Maserati GranTurismo are in a similar position, because it’ll be offered as a V6 petrol or an electric coupé.

Here, we're mainly covering the "unhealthy" petrol GranTurismo – we'll fully review the all-electric option, badged the Folgore, when it arrives in 2024.

The latest version of the Italian brand’s GT looks similar to the previous GranTurismo on the outside, but there’s a more up-to-date approach underneath. Indeed, the powerful petrol engine under the bonnet is now smaller and turbocharged to help boost efficiency.

The Folgore – which serves as the flagship model – gets a slightly smoother look, with different bumpers and wheels. And, of course, you'll be able to identify it from the lack of engine noise and exhausts.

Meanwhile, the leather-swathed interior continues to look as inviting as before, with a reasonable amount of space for four occupants and most of their luggage. It now comes with the latest Maserati dashboard design housing the current suite of tech, so it should be almost as user-friendly as the Maserati Grecale SUV.

So, have the updates kept it competitive with the best coupés? Read on to find out whether the Maserati GranTurismo has the GT cruising abilities of the Bentley Continental GT or the handling prowess of the Aston Martin DB12...

Overview

Whether it’s a long motorway jaunt or a country road blast, the latest Maserati GranTurismo is vastly more capable and comfortable than its predecessor. The interior quality doesn’t quite live up to the price and some will wish for a more exotic soundtrack, but this is a relatively small compromise in what is the most polished GranTurismo yet.

  • Balances long-distance comfort with agile handling
  • Useful rear-seat and boot space
  • Huge performance
  • Disappointing engine noise
  • Aston Martin DB12 is sharper to drive
  • Bentley Continental GT has a plusher interior
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Target Price from £133,120
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From £129,500

Performance & drive

What it’s like to drive, and how quiet it is

The petrol versions of the Maserati GranTurismo – called the Modena and the Trofeo – come with a 3.0-litre twin-turbocharged V6 engine.

It’s effectively a detuned version of the unit found in the Maserati MC20 performance car, delivering a more refined and brisk experience, rather than a thrilling one. That’s not to say you’ll be short on pace, though.

Even the entry-level Modena produces 483bhp, which is enough for a 0-62mph time of 3.9 seconds. So far, we’ve driven the more powerful Trofeo, which develops 542bhp and trims the 0-62mph time down to 3.5 seconds, which is 0.1 seconds quicker than the Aston Martin Vantage.

And the sound? Well, given its predecessor’s theatrical-sounding V8, the noise of the new GranTurismo’s V6 engine is a bit disappointing.

The rather agricultural sound on start-up (accompanied by plenty of vibration felt through the seats) never really develops into a tuneful howl, even in its louder setting in Sport drive mode (or the extra Corsa mode you get on Trofeo versions). Most rival coupés sound more exotic whether you’re in or outside the car.

Maserati Granturismo image
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All petrol engines come with an eight-speed automatic gearbox. It flicks through the gears quickly and smoothly when driving normally, but punches through the gears in the sportier drive modes. You can also shift using large metal paddles behind the steering wheel, although the changes are not quite as slick and snappy as a PDK gearbox in the Porsche 911.

When you switch from the default GT mode into Comfort mode, the relaxed accelerator pedal response helps the engine settle down on a cruise.

The GranTurismo is just as pleasant on a motorway jaunt as it is on a quick country-road blast. Engine noise fades into the background, while wind and road noise remain low. There’s a faint drone from the exhaust, but that can be easily drowned out by the stereo.

The suspension thumps a bit at low speeds in its firmest setting in the sportier drive modes, but otherwise it’s more peaceful than a 911. The much pricier Bentley Continental GT remains on another level in terms of isolating occupants from the outside world, though.

Naturally, the all-electric Folgore will be the quietest version in the range – and also the most powerful. Its three electric motors (two for the rear wheels and one for the fronts) develop 750bhp for a 0-62mph time of just 2.7 seconds.

The Folgore's 83kWh (usable capacity) battery brings an official range of up to 279 miles, which is roughly in line with the 751bhp Porsche Taycan Turbo S, with its 291-mile range and 2.8 seconds 0-62mph sprint time. 

Whether you go for the Modena, the Trofeo or the Folgore, your GranTurismo comes with adaptive suspension as standard. The ride is firm at low speeds regardless of which drive mode you go for, with occupants subtly moving around in their seats over bumps.

Thankfully, it rounds off imperfections and potholes well enough to never be uncomfortable, being no worse than a Jaguar F-Type. Sportier drive modes have an even firmer setting that leads to a busier low-speed ride that amplifies bumps, but you can switch it down to a softer mode at the press of a button.

The firm ride is less of an issue at higher speeds, and the GranTurismo is effortlessly handy on a twisty road. The steering response is well judged – it’s not as sharp off-centre as the MC20, but it's direct enough to turn keenly into corners.

Meanwhile, there’s enough weight build-up to help you place the front of the car accurately. The Aston Martin DB12 has an even stronger sense of connection to the front wheels and is even more engaging, but that car does feel wider down a country road.

It’s easy to stop smoothly, but the brakes could be stronger at higher speeds. That's perhaps the main giveaway that this is not a particularly light car.

Regardless of which power output you go for, every GranTurismo has four-wheel drive. There’s a bit of tyre scrabble from the rear tyres when setting off in wet conditions, but traction is otherwise strong.

Driving overview

Strengths Punchy engines; fun to drive yet comfortable on a motorway stint

Weaknesses Unexciting engine noise

Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo rear cornering

Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

You’ll find it easy to get comfy behind the wheel of the Maserati GranTurismo, with plenty of adjustment from the driver’s seat (including lumbar support) and steering wheel.

You can change the size of the side bolster by a huge amount, but while all other seat adjustments are done through buttons on the side of the seat, that option is hidden in a menu within the touchscreen.

You don’t sit as close to the floor as you would in the Aston Martin DB12 or the Jaguar F-Type, but you do get a good view over the bonnet.

Being sat quite close to the thick front windscreen pillars means they do obstruct the view at junctions, although the frameless side windows help give a clear view over your shoulder. Front and rear parking sensors come as standard, while a 360-degree surround-view camera is optional as part of a pack on all versions.

The dashboard layout is relatively simple and easy to get to grips with. The driver gets a 12.2in instrument panel that comes with sharp graphics and offers plenty of information that you can scroll through using buttons on the left spoke of the steering wheel.

There’s also a head-up display available as part of the Tech Assistance package, which also adds adaptive LED headlights and a digital rear-view mirror.

Most of the controls are found on the 12.3in touchscreen infotainment system. It comes with the latest version of Maserati’s infotainment system, which is equipped with DAB radio, and Android Auto and Apple CarPlay smartphone mirroring.

There’s a useful column of shortcuts positioned close to the driver to hop between functions and the main icons are easy enough to aim for. The response time to inputs could be quicker, though.

There's a smaller 8.8in touchscreen mounted lower down for the ventilation and driver controls, such as the headlights. It’s tilted upwards to make it easier to read and for your hand to fall on than a vertical one, but the smaller icons are trickier to glance and aim for while driving.

True, we’re glad the two touchscreens spread out the controls to make them a little easier to locate, but the mix of physical buttons and a rotary-dial controlled iDrive system in the BMW M8 is far more precise to use.

While material quality has been a bit of a let-down on other Maserati models, we’re happy to report that the GranTurismo’s has greatly improved on its predecessor. You’ll find soft leather on most surfaces, and few plastic panels. The trim finishers feel more upmarket than before too.

The thing is, given the price tag, you’d expect the finish on the relatively few buttons to feel nicer and be better damped when pressed. Some of the interior panels don’t feel that robust, either, lacking the sense of sturdiness you get in a Bentley Continental GT.

Interior overview

Strengths Comfortable driving position; supportive seats; reasonable visibility 

Weaknesses Interior could feel more plush and robust at this price

Maserati GranTurismo Trofeo dashboard

Passenger & boot space

How it copes with people and clutter

Space isn’t a problem if you’re sitting in the front of the Maserati GranTurismo, where head, leg and shoulder room are in generous supply.

Front storage space includes a pair of cupholders, a wireless phone-charging tray and a couple of storage cubbies on the centre console. The door bins are quite small, but no worse than those in a Jaguar F-Type.

While the news isn’t quite as good for those sitting in the back, it's still more practical than most coupés at this price. Anyone under six feet tall will be fine in the back, with enough knee room when sitting behind a similarly tall occupant, and space to tuck your feet under the front seat.

There’s enough head room in the back that while your head might brush the roof lining, you shouldn't have to rest your head on the sloping rear window, as you do in rival cars. Storage space is limited to a pair of centrally mounted cup holders, but at least there's an air vent to boost comfort.

The boot has a flat floor and there’s little intrusion from the sides, making it a very usable load area. We easily managed to fit in five carry-on suitcases with space to spare for a couple of soft overnight bags. Petrol GranTurismos get 310 litres of boot space, while the Folgore electric version has 270 litres.

The rear seats don’t fold down to accommodate larger items, but there is a ski hatch that lets you thread longer items through the back rest in between the two rear occupants.

Practicality overview

Strengths Decent front space; genuinely usable rear seats and boot

Weaknesses Limited storage space

Maserati GranTurismo interior back seats

Buying & owning

Everyday costs, plus how reliable and safe it is

The entry-level Maserati GranTurismo in Modena trim undercuts the BMW M8 Competition and is significantly cheaper than the Aston Martin DB12 and the Bentley Continental GT. It's also predicted to lose its value far more slowly than a BMW M8 over three years.

The prospect of day-to-day running costs for a V6 engine that indicated no more than 25mpg during our time driving a GranTurismo Trofeo is no less intimidating than its asking price. CO2 emissions are expectedly high and so is the tax.

While the Folgore electric car won’t suffer as heavily on either of these costs, all versions will attract high insurance premiums and annual servicing costs – especially when you need a new set of 21in tyres. The same is true of the rivals.

The Folgore has a maximum charging rate of 270kW (matching the Porsche Taycan), with a 10-80% charge taking around 20mins with a quick charger.

You get a generous list of equipment in return for your outlay, including heated front leather seats, two-zone climate control, keyless entry and start and LED headlights.

There are plenty of options that push up the price, including ventilated front seats, a 19-speaker Sonus Faber audio system upgrade and privacy glass. Adaptive cruise control is also part of an ADAS option pack that includes more safety equipment.

The GranTurismo hasn’t been crash-tested by Euro NCAP or security tested by Thatcham, but blind-spot monitoring, lane-keep assist, traffic-sign recognition and cross-traffic assist are all part of option packs.

Costs overview

Strengths Simple specification line-up; all versions well equipped

Weaknesses Plenty of options to drive up the price


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Maserati GranTurismo interior driver display

FAQs

  • In percentage terms, the GranTurismo holds a higher proportion of its value over three years than the BMW M8 but slightly less than the Bentley Continental GT.

  • Even the cheapest version costs well into six figures new. For the latest prices, see our New Car Deals pages.

At a glance
New car deals
Target Price from £133,120
Swipe to see used car deals
Nearly new deals
From £129,500
RRP price range £133,120 - £237,500
Number of trims (see all)6
Number of engines (see all)3
Available fuel types (which is best for you?)petrol, electric
MPG range across all versions 27.8 - 28.2
Available doors options 2
Company car tax at 20% (min/max) £360 / £15,767
Company car tax at 40% (min/max) £720 / £31,534
Available colours